Guatemala Expat Feed
Sign In or Sign Up to post a new topic
busman7 replied to the thread Banking questions on the Guatemala forum on April 27, 2015:
DeliaLopez initially posted:
I was trying to post on the banking topic already created and it won't let me? I have read you need a Guatemalen to help you get an account at BAM and Citi says it needs 3 months utility bills. So does BAM pay 5% like citibank does? We have applied for Pensianodo residency and it takes a few months from them accepting the docs. So I only have the papers with the number from Immigration showing application has been made. Anyone have answers to these questions? Also we found a lot that seems a good buy, do we go to an abrogado to handle the title search, transfer etc Can that be closed before the Pensianado paperwork is over? Thank you D
busman7 replied 6 hours ago with:
I would also advise you to live in the area for a year or so before buying to make sure you like the area and also a lot that looks fine in the dry season, can be under water in a prolonged period of rain in the wet season.
AlPavarotti replied 9 hours ago with:
Please don't get me wrong. I'm not trying to scare you. Just trying to advise you to be cautious on how to proceed with the purchase. But believe it or not that, from experience I'm telling you that if you were in Mexico or in some other latin country things would be much more complicated. I don't know what plans you have for the lot you want to buy. But when you own a piece of land you can have a beautiful pre-fabricated home built on your site at a very reasonable price. I've only seen the models in guatemala city. The company has been building them for many years.And it's called Casas tipo Canadiense. And you can google the name on line to check it out. I bought and sold real estate in guatemala years ago for my own use. And I never had any problems. You could also have your tramitador when he goes to check the title to ask for a written certification, which cost a few quetzales. But it takes about two days before you can pick it up. You're doing fine. And I'm sure you'll be OK. I don't know how long you've lived in guatemala. But if you haven't lived there for a few years. I'd wait to get to learn how things are done there before rushing to buy real estate. Because if you're not happy with it, is not going to be easy to try to sell it. Good luck.
Sign In or Sign Up to reply
property in GuatemalaLand located just outside San Marcos La Laguna, with great views. 6,000 above the road, great location to build a house. Facing South West.Municipal water near by , electricity as well
kweary replied to the thread GPS Car Navigation on the Guatemala forum on April 20, 2015:
Xpatch initially posted:
Does anyone use an after market GPS or iPhone navigation setup in theri car. I have a car in Antigua without GPS and the Garmin Co., and GPS online, do not sell digital maps for Guatemala. Is it possible to buy a GPS unit in Guatemala loaded with the countries map. Or does anyone have a good at to navigate without having to use paper maps? Thanks.?
kweary replied on April 20, 2015 with:
You can buy maps for your Garmin that will work in Guatemala at this site: http://www.gpstravelmaps.com/gps-maps/central-america/guatemala.php BUT you don't have too... All you have to do is go to this site http://garmin.openstreetmap.nl/ and select the regions you want to download, then upload them onto your GPS. All for free. Alternatively you can download ORUX maps if you use an Android phone, then download maps for Central America. This will not use your data plan. This is also free. I've done and have used both of these methods (still do in fact).
DeliaLopez replied on April 17, 2015 with:
I found a free map online it is an all volunteer effort they email it to you and you put it on a chip. I put the chip in our NUVI and it worked well last time in Guate and we were out in the sticks. search for garmin compatible fre download and you should find it. I am in Guate and my computer is in USA so I can't remember the name or anything. I was afraid it would not be good but we took the road south to Puerto San Jose then drove down the coast across a ferry above Montericco and up to Estanzuela, then Coban down the little roads through Rabbinal and had no problems, well with the map. Road construction slow buses in front. If NUVI said 1 hr it would be 2
Sign In or Sign Up to reply
property in Guatemala2 bedroom house on the shore of Lake Atitlan with incredible views of Santiago and the 2 Santiago volcanoes. Quiet and secluded, yet just 3 minutes by boat from town, this is a tranquil place to recharge.
property in Guatemala2 bedroom house with custom designed furniture, 2 full baths, 2 swimming pools, and almost 2 acres of grounds with winding stone walkways and gardens everywhere. Off the grid, boat access only but only a 3 minute boat ride to town. One bedroom fully equipped guest cottage with the same incredible views.
zaqwsx replied to the thread Bringing prescription drugs into Guatemala on the Guatemala forum:
DebAntigua initially posted:
We will be arriving in Guatemala using the 90 day tourist visa, but we plan to extend it and stay a full 6 months before heading back to the States. So we'll be gone for 6 months. I have a lot of prescription medications that I take on a regular basis, and in most cases I have been able to get enough on hand to cover me for the full 6 months. In addition, due to previous bariatric surgery, I have to take special vitamins and calcium and will be bringing a 6 month supply of those as well (which are 7 large bottles full of capsules, in original containers). I'm a bit worried about how Guatemalan customs might react to such large volumes of medications. All of the prescription items are in labeled containers with my name on the label, but it's still a lot of stuff. Questions: - Should I declare this on the form as drugs? Or is that question just referring to items for resale? - Will I owe any taxes or duty for these personal medications, since it is 6 months worth? - Anything advice you can share about how best to approach this with immigration will be appreciated!
zaqwsx replied most recently with:
I agree a 6 month supply should not be a problem. I have cleared customs at the Guatemala airport more than a dozen times in the last couple of years and have never opened a suitcase or even been asked a question, but the law is 90 day limit with a prescription. This is Latin America, you never know what is going to change or if your going to get a new guy or The U.S. is throwing money around like drunken sailors and forcing enforcement. Also for later imports a prescription, even a Guatemalan one does you no good, you need the form, I should also mention it is often far cheaper to buy your drugs here. I had one prescription in Florida last year and when I went to CVS to fill it they wanted $197.00 as a co-pay. I told then where to put it and got it over the counter here for less than $50.00. Also seeing a doctor here is often less than the co-pay in the U.S. Western medicine all over the world is taught in English
molar6 replied most recently with:
I have never had a problem with a six month supply. First combine bottles, no one will count the number of pills. Do the same with the vitamins. No one wll ask how many vitamin D you take a day. To ship via Cadiz you need a local doc to give you a prescription if you want the meds or vitamins shipped by air. If not it can be 4 or more weeks by boat. Remember the slow boat to China, well it slower here.
Sign In or Sign Up to reply
busman7 replied to the thread debit card rejected for visa extension on the Guatemala forum:
DanRadin initially posted:
I went to pick up my passport with my 90-day extension last Friday. I wasn't able to get my passport because the photocopy that I had given them a week before was of a debit card. It was the same debit card that they had accepted the last time I went for my extension. I guess it just depends on how carefully they look.
busman7 replied most recently with:
Hey dude answer the question, the OP was inquiring about a tourist visa extension. You replied saying you were working, apples to oranges, 2 different visas or you are working on a tourist visa. ┬┐Which is it?
kgriff replied most recently with:
I work for a US corporation and get paid directly into my US bank account. Please stick to the topic of the post. Do not be offended when someone points out errors in something you said.
Sign In or Sign Up to reply
AlPavarotti replied to the thread Paternity Testing on the Guatemala forum:
AtitlanArtist initially posted:
Does anyone know about paternity testing in Guatemala? Which labs do it and how much does it cost?
AlPavarotti replied most recently with:
On my first try I didn't come up with anything either. Well I'm glad you're taken an interest in helping that woman. Hopefully the place at the university doest it for free, or at least at a reasonable price. Please let me know if I can be of any additional help.
AtitlanArtist replied most recently with:
Thanks so much! I did Google it, but didn't come up with that! The interested party will be eternally grateful! I hope it all works out. Since 2008 it is a Guatemala law that a woman can demand that a man take a paternity test and if it comes out positive, he will be responsible for helping to support the child. The question is who pays for the test? We will help the young woman if we can.
Sign In or Sign Up to reply
I am a Producer with Karga Seven Pictures and we have created a series for Travel Channel about American families/couples who are relocating to different places around the world. Guatemala will be one of the episodes! If you or your spouse has an opportunity to relocate from America to any town in Guatemala I would love to hear about it. Shoot me an email: joe@karga7.com Joe
Sign In or Sign Up to reply
AlPavarotti replied to the thread Health insurance on the Guatemala forum:
Xpatch initially posted:
I've, my wife and I, are entering as tourists and applying as residency. Would anyone be able to fill me in on health insurance company's in Guatemala, Thank you
AlPavarotti replied most recently with:
Hi there. As far as I know Granai & Townson (G&T) is one of the oldest financial institutions in the country. Years back they added health and auto innsurance to their line of business. I'm not endorsing that company because I have never had any kind of health insurance in guatemala. But I went ahead and googled that for you. And I found their webpage at www.segurosgyt.com.gt click where it says SALUD to check on PLANES DE SALUD and ask for a quote on line on health insurance plans. I had already mentioned the Herrera Llerandi Hospital as one of the best in the country base on my wife's experience. Now, believe it or not, at one time my brother in law happened to be in guatemala when he suffered a brain aneurysm (sp) 160 kilometers from guatemala city. He was taken by ambulance to Hospital Roosevelt, a public hospital where he underwent a free of charge sussessful operation. He spents a lot of time in Mazatenango. And at another time he had a prostate operation at the public hospital in Mazatenango. And to this day he says he feels fine. And that's why I know that medical services in guatemala including public hospitals, and the social security hospitals (IGGS) (INSTITUTO GUATEMALTECO DE SEGURIDAD SOCIAL) for workers that are eligible for their services because they pay a small deduction out of their pay check are good. Thank god that corporate greedy mentality that runs here in the US has not infected other countries in the world. The way I see it, health care should be a constitutional right, and not a privilege for only the ones that can afford it.
Xpatch replied most recently with:
Hito clarify, 2 types of business sell health insurance:Guatamalen banks and health insurance company's, and I may purchase through with type of business. If this sounds dense I apologize.
Sign In or Sign Up to reply

Join Expat Exchange (FREE)

Become a member of Expat Exchange today to meet other expats in your area or get advice before moving overseas. Membership is FREE and takes 1 minute!

Subscribe to Our Weekly Newsletter

Subscribe to The Foreign Exchange, our weekly newsletter, read by over 70,000 expats worldwide: