Expat Exchange
Free MembershipSign In

What do expats find most challenging?

Answer this Question

AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers

We asked expats and digital nomads what they find the most challenging about the local culture in Abidjan. They wrote...

"The most common challenges faced by expats include language barriers, adapting to a new culture, difficulties in connecting and building relationships, feeling isolated and disconnected, navigating the legal and bureaucratic systems and balancing work and family life," remarked another expat in Abidjan, Ivory Coast.

"A couple of things... first has been the corrupt government and along with that, the bribing that goes on here. Currently, Ivory Coast has the fastest growing economy in Africa. But the local people are not reaping the rewards -- only the wealthy and government connected Lebanese and Ivorians are. It is extremely difficult and frustrating to see this very apparent inequality happening right in front of your face. Minimum wage has not been raised for many years and is currently at CFA 60,000/month... which is roughly USD $120. However, the price of electricity, for example, is very expensive at approximately USD $40 for very very very minimal usage in a small home. And high speed internet (2MBPS) is also roughly USD $40. This is not to mention rents, which have skyrocketed in the last 3 years... a modest, old style apartment in an okay part of the city will easily run you CFA 300,000/month. So obviously, this minimum wage is NOT a livable wage. For such a fast and wealthy growing economy - you would think they could do better for the people. But instead, the high ranking officials keep most of if for themselves. This also leads to bribing - which happens constantly and overtly here. I have been stopped 4 times by the police while driving just to "check my papers"... but I am always asked to pay something to them. They don't always give a reason, though sometimes they will make something up like, "your windows are too tinted" or "your tires don't seem to be in regulation with the car". And then they ask you for the equivalent of USD $3-5. It doesn't seem like a lot, but it is the principle of needing to pay someone, even though you've done nothing wrong. This happens all the time. I have been asked for money from the electricity company, the security company at our home, the driving license bureau, the lady who took my blood at the hospital, the guardian at my bank... everywhere. And it is outright and open. They are not ashamed to do it. It seems to be just a way of life - they expect you to give them extra money and they have no problem asking you for it," said a member in Abidjan, Ivory Coast.

Please login to continue reading this article.

Not a member? Join Today (it's free).

Other Questions:

What do expats find most challenging?

If you live in Abidjan, newcomers to Abidjan would love to hear your answer to this question.


About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

William Russell Health InsuranceExpat Health Insurance

Get a quote for international health insurance from our partner, William Russell.
GET A QUOTE

William Russell Health InsuranceExpat Health Insurance

Get a quote for international health insurance from our partner, William Russell.
GET A QUOTE

Contribute to Ivory Coast Network Contribute
Help others in Ivory Coast by answering questions about the challenges and adventures of living in Ivory Coast.

AGS Worldwide Movers
AGS Worldwide Movers

Copyright 1997-2023 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal