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Cost of Living in Ronda

By Betsy Burlingame

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Summary: Understanding the the cost of living in Ronda helps a newcomer what to expect when it comes to apartment or house hunting, grocery shopping, transportation, dining out, utilities and more.

Cost of Living Category Estimated Cost
Apartment Rental (1 bedroom in City Center) €300 - €500 per month
Apartment Rental (1 bedroom Outside of City Center) €200 - €400 per month
Apartment Purchase Price (City Center) €1,200 - €2,000 per square meter
Apartment Purchase Price (Outside of City Center) €800 - €1,500 per square meter
Public Transportation (Monthly Pass) €30 - €50
Gasoline (1 liter) €1.20 - €1.40
Basic Utilities (Electricity, Heating, Cooling, Water, Garbage) €100 - €150 per month
Internet (60 Mbps or More, Unlimited Data, Cable/ADSL) €30 - €50 per month
Groceries (Milk, Bread, Eggs, Fruits, Chicken, Beef, etc.) €200 - €300 per month
Meal at an Inexpensive Restaurant €10 - €15
Three-Course Meal for 2 People at a Mid-range Restaurant €30 - €50
Private Preschool Tuition (Monthly) €200 - €400
Private Elementary School Tuition (Yearly) €4,000 - €8,000
Private Middle School Tuition (Yearly) €6,000 - €10,000
Private High School Tuition (Yearly) €8,000 - €12,000
Please note that these are estimated costs and can vary based on various factors such as location within Ronda, personal lifestyle, and fluctuations in the market. The cost of living in Ronda is generally lower compared to larger cities in Spain like Madrid or Barcelona. Renting an apartment in the city center of Ronda can cost between €300 and €500 per month for a one-bedroom apartment, while outside the city center, the cost can drop to between €200 and €400 per month. If you're considering buying an apartment, the price per square meter in the city center ranges from €1,200 to €2,000, and outside the city center, it's between €800 and €1,500.Public transportation is quite affordable, with a monthly pass costing between €30 and €50. Gasoline costs between €1.20 and €1.40 per liter.Basic utilities, including electricity, heating, cooling, water, and garbage, cost between €100 and €150 per month. Internet service, with 60 Mbps or more and unlimited data, costs between €30 and €50 per month.Grocery costs can vary based on personal eating habits, but on average, you can expect to spend between €200 and €300 per month. Dining out is also relatively affordable, with a meal at an inexpensive restaurant costing between €10 and €15, and a three-course meal for two at a mid-range restaurant costing between €30 and €50.Private school tuition can vary greatly, but on average, you can expect to pay between €200 and €400 per month for preschool, between €4,000 and €8,000 per year for elementary school, between €6,000 and €10,000 per year for middle school, and between €8,000 and €12,000 per year for high school.

Monthly Budget for Retirees in Ronda

"The cost of living in Ronda is considered to be lower than in many other parts of Spain, especially compared to major cities like Madrid or Barcelona. Rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center is quite affordable, while outside the city center, it is even cheaper. Groceries are also reasonably priced, with local markets offering fresh produce at lower costs. Eating out at restaurants can vary, with inexpensive meals available, as well as more costly dining options. Public transportation in Ronda is affordable, but many residents choose to walk or bike due to the city's small size. Utilities such as electricity, heating, cooling, and water are not overly expensive, and internet is also reasonably priced. Healthcare in Ronda, as in the rest of Spain, is of high quality and is not overly expensive. Overall, the cost of living in Ronda is quite manageable, especially for those earning a local salary. However, it's important to note that costs can vary depending on lifestyle and personal spending habits," said one expat living in Ronda.

Can I live in Ronda on $1,500 a month?

"I've been living in Ronda for a few years now and I can tell you that it's definitely possible to live comfortably on $1,500 a month, but it does require some careful budgeting and lifestyle adjustments. Ronda is a beautiful city with a rich history and a slower pace of life, which can be a nice change from the hustle and bustle of modern city living. The cost of living here is relatively low compared to other parts of Spain. You can find a decent one-bedroom apartment in the city center for around $500-$600 a month. If you're willing to live a bit further out, in neighborhoods like San Francisco or La Planilla, you can find even cheaper options. These areas are still very accessible and have all the necessary amenities, so they're a good option if you're looking to save money. On the other hand, neighborhoods like La Ciudad and Mercadillo are more expensive. They're closer to the city center and have more upscale apartments, so you might want to avoid these if you're on a tight budget. Groceries are also quite affordable. You can expect to spend around $200-$300 a month on food if you cook at home. Eating out is also relatively cheap compared to other countries. A meal at a mid-range restaurant will cost you around $10-$15. Utilities, including electricity, heating, cooling, water, and garbage, will cost you around $100-$150 a month. Internet and mobile phone plans are also quite affordable, around $30-$50 a month. Public transportation is reliable and cheap, but Ronda is a small city and it's quite walkable, so you might not need to use it that much. A monthly pass costs around $30. Healthcare in Spain is excellent and affordable. If you're a resident, you can access the public healthcare system for free. If you're not, you can get private health insurance for around $100 a month. The biggest sacrifice you'll have to make is probably related to entertainment and discretionary spending. You'll have to be mindful of your spending on things like eating out, shopping, and traveling. But if you're willing to live a simpler lifestyle and enjoy the local culture and natural beauty of Ronda, I think you'll find it's a very rewarding experience," commented an expat living in Ronda.

Can I live in Ronda on $3,500 a month?

"I've been living in Ronda for a few years now and I can tell you that it's definitely possible to live comfortably on $3,000 a month, even if you're used to modern amenities. Ronda is a small city, so the cost of living is significantly lower than in larger Spanish cities like Madrid or Barcelona. The biggest expense you'll have is probably housing. If you want to live in the city center, you can expect to pay around $800 to $1,000 a month for a decent apartment. However, if you're willing to live a bit further out, in neighborhoods like San Francisco or La Planilla, you can find cheaper options, around $500 to $700 a month. These neighborhoods are still very nice and have all the amenities you need, they're just a bit less central. As for other expenses, groceries are quite affordable here. I spend around $200 a month on groceries, and that's for high-quality, fresh produce. Eating out is also quite cheap, with a meal at a decent restaurant costing around $10 to $15. Utilities, including internet, electricity, and water, usually come to around $150 a month. Transportation is another area where you can save money. Ronda is small enough that you can walk or bike almost anywhere, so you don't really need a car. If you do decide to get one, gas is a bit expensive, around $1.30 per liter, but you won't be driving long distances so it won't add up to much. The one area where you might have to make a sacrifice is in entertainment. There's not a lot of high-end shopping or luxury entertainment options in Ronda. But there's plenty of cultural activities, like visiting the famous Ronda bridge or the bullring, and the city is surrounded by beautiful countryside for hiking and exploring. In terms of healthcare, Spain has an excellent healthcare system and as a resident, you'll have access to it. Private health insurance is also quite affordable, around $100 a month. So, all in all, I'd say that living in Ronda on $3,000 a month is not only possible, but you can live quite comfortably. You might have to make a few sacrifices, like living a bit further from the city center and not having as many luxury entertainment options, but in return, you get to live in a beautiful, historic city with a great quality of life," said one expat living in Ronda.

Can I live in Ronda on $5,000 a month?

"I've been living in Ronda for a few years now and I can tell you that living on $5,000 a month is not only possible, but you can live quite comfortably. Ronda is a beautiful city with a rich history and a slower pace of life than you might be used to, but it's also quite affordable. The cost of living here is significantly lower than in larger cities like Madrid or Barcelona. For housing, I'd recommend looking in neighborhoods like San Francisco or La Ciudad. These areas are not only affordable but also offer a good quality of life. You can find a nice apartment for around $600-$800 a month. If you prefer a house, expect to pay around $1,000-$1,500 a month. Utilities, including electricity, water, and internet, will cost you around $200 a month. Groceries are also quite affordable. I spend around $300 a month on groceries, but I cook most of my meals at home. If you prefer to eat out, a meal at a mid-range restaurant will cost you around $15-$20. Transportation is also quite affordable. A monthly pass for public transportation costs around $40. However, Ronda is a small city and most places are within walking distance. If you prefer to drive, gasoline costs around $1.30 per liter. Healthcare in Spain is excellent and affordable. If you're a resident, you'll have access to the public healthcare system. However, if you prefer private healthcare, expect to pay around $200 a month for a good health insurance plan. As for entertainment, there's plenty to do in Ronda. The city is famous for its bullring and its beautiful old town. There are also plenty of parks, museums, and historical sites to visit. A ticket to a museum or historical site will cost you around $10. However, there are some sacrifices you'll have to make. For example, if you're used to a fast-paced city life, you might find Ronda a bit slow. Also, while most people speak some English, it's not as widely spoken as in larger cities. In terms of neighborhoods to avoid, I'd say be cautious about areas like Padre Jesús and La Dehesa. While they're not necessarily dangerous, they're a bit more run-down and don't offer the same quality of life as other neighborhoods. Overall, I'd say that living in Ronda on $5,000 a month is not only possible, but you can live quite comfortably. You'll have to adjust to a slower pace of life and perhaps learn some Spanish, but in return, you'll get to live in a beautiful city with a rich history and a low cost of living," commented an expat living in Ronda.

About the Author

Betsy Burlingame Betsy Burlingame is the Founder and President of Expat Exchange and is one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. She launched Expat Exchange in 1997 as her Master's thesis project at NYU. Prior to Expat Exchange, Betsy worked at AT&T in International and Mass Market Marketing. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a BA in International Business and German.

Some of Betsy's articles include 12 Best Places to Live in Portugal, 7 Best Places to Live in Panama and 12 Things to Know Before Moving to the Dominican Republic. Betsy loves to travel and spend time with her family. Connect with Betsy on LinkedIn.


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