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El Puente Roto (Broken Bridge) in Cuenca, Ecuador

Cuenca, Ecuador

By Joshua Wood, LPC

Last updated on Jan 18, 2023

Summary: Cuenca, Ecuador is a beautiful, colonial city with a vibrant culture and friendly people. Expats love the low cost of living, the temperate climate, and the abundance of outdoor activities. The weather in Cuenca is generally mild, with temperatures ranging from the mid-50s to the mid-70s Fahrenheit. The average cost of living for an expat is estimated to be around $1,000 to $1,500 per month. A one bedroom apartment typically costs between $200 and $400 per month, while a two bedroom apartment can range from $300 to $500 per month. The population of Cuenca is approximately 500,000 people.

What do I need to know about living in Cuenca?

When we asked people what advice they would give someone preparing to move to Cuenca, they said:

"I would first of all tell them that it is winter here now while it is summer in the 48 states. The houses here are not heated, and I wear 4 or 5 layers of clothes. That said, if any of my friends are people who have more money, savings, and bank accounts than I do, I would tell them that they can live very well here. I think that there are ways to tell friends how they can get acclimated to Ecuador according to their lifestyle interests, in several ways. They can visit and have a stay of 90 days, before they need to leave. Some people leave for a few days to a nearby country and return as if for the first time and can stay for another 90 days," added another expat who made the move to Cuenca.

"Bring comfortable shoes and get ready to live in a physically splendid environment. The people are gentle. Like any foreign culture, it is deceptively similar to America, but the little differences can sink you if you aren't totally flexible. Stay away from ex-pats, as a rule," explained one expat living in Cuenca, Ecuador.

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What do I need to know before moving to Cuenca?

When we asked people what advice they would give someone preparing to move to Cuenca, they said:

"Gringos are the preferred tenants in Ecuador. The reasons why will be of interest. 1. Ecuadorian law is ALL in favor of the tenant. So Ecuadorians will often not pay and it takes ages to evict them. 2. Though the leases may say different, the Law takes precedence. For example, if they turn your water, gas, electricity off, they are breaking the Law and liable for all damages. My suggestion is to: A. stay in a B&B (there are many at 25$ a day) B. Scope the areas suggested here to find one that suits you. C. if necessary, hire a facilitator (they are bilingual translators at 4$/hr+) to help with the language or suggestions. https://yapatree.com/cuenca-facilitators-make-life-easier/ D. Go to buildings in the areas you liked and ask the doormen if anything is for rent. The search investment is well worth your time," added another expat who made the move to Cuenca.

"Find a local you can trust. Start with small tasks you can do together to help both of you understand how the system works and to establish your working relationship. Change is inevitable you have to learn to accept it. Once you learn this life becomes much easier. Most countries will not do it the way western countries do it. That does not mean their way is necessarily wrong," explained one expat living in Cuenca, Ecuador.

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How do I find a place to live in Cuenca?

We asked expats how they chose their neighborhood and found a place to live. They answered:

"Because my Spanish was limited when I arrived I found someone who had helped people in her church find an apartment. We looked at many. Some were terrible and some were ok and by the seventh day, I found the perfect place. She was most helpful and she kept telling me to speak Spanish which was not really easy but I did it anyway," added another expat in Cuenca.

"Can only afford to rent a room so I rent from another Californian (a blessing) in a mostly quiet building of other North Americans. It is a condo. Met the dear lady I rent from at church," remarked another expat who made the move to Cuenca.

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What is a typical expat home or apartment like in Cuenca?

"I would not say it is not typical. Most expats decide to live in an apartment or penthouse in a primarily English speaking neighborhood with more upscale restaurants. Others will live closer to downtown as it is less expensive. I chose to live in a Spanish speaking neighborhood by one of the rivers and across from the park. The birds sing every morning," mentioned another expat in Cuenca.

"11th floor 2B/2B condo with river view and 24 hour security guards and underground car parking," commented one expat who made the move to Cuenca.

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What is the average cost of housing in Cuenca?

If you are thinking about moving to Cuenca, cost of living in probably a key consideration. Expats commented about the cost of housing:

"I could never find a place like what I would get in the US. It is probably 3 to 4 less than in the states," added another expat who made the move to Cuenca.

"Housing for expats seems to be going up mostly because new expats will pay the asking prices which are still much cheaper then in the US. Furnished apartments average $500-$700. Unfurnished $300-$500 http://gas2335.blogspot.com/2013/05/update-on-my-cuenca-ecuador-condo.html," explained one expat living in Cuenca, Ecuador.

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How do I meet people in Cuenca?

When we asked people living in Cuenca about club and activities where newcomers can meet others, they responded:

"For the folks planning to visit and stay longer in Cuenca, Ecuador I recommend that you subscribe to the three printed media that are available for people abroad and those who live here. They are: CuencaHighLife, GringoPost. There you will get a good idea of what people are saying, what improvements the local and central government are making and planning to make, and how the ordinary expats and English speaking people are feeling, what they are doing, how they communicate with one another. Shops and businesses, restaurants, licensed therapists and doctors all post and are also asking to be recommended on Gringo Post. I have attempted to go to many activities including free movies, therapist lectures, free Spanish conversation classes, but so far I have only managed to get to the Jazz Society Cafe. I arrived there after a day of shopping with only enough money to take the taxi home late at night. I told the head waiter that I would pay double next time. I am an artist, and when the pianist saw me take out my watercolors, he asked the house if I could stay. That worked. Not many clubs or restaurants take credit cards. The big supermarkets do, and they always ask for my passport copy. I recommend everyone have a color print of their passport with the Passport number written clearly at the bottom. For meeting others, there are organized groups among the expat Americans and other foreigners and the meetings are posted in Gringo Post. I am a gringa so I read this every day. I select the events that I am interested in, with the addresses, dates and phone numbers, and copy them into a text message and into my calendar. There are specific cafes and restaurants that the expats do frequent. I attended a meeting of the American Consulate and Embassy one evening which took place at a popular art gallery. Members of the Business Bureau spoke and the group handed out envelopes for everything necessary to start up in Cuenca, from handyman to English speaking taxi drivers and licensed electricians, etc. There are experts in wifi and in Macintosh as well as any components for computer usage," said another expat in Cuenca.

"Avoid gringos at all costs - they are old and out of sorts. Half of them go home within a year. Learn Spanish as fast as you can. Immerse. Learn Ecuadorian culture and get with it. Meet Ecuadorians any way you can," added another expat who made the move to Cuenca.

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William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

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What should I bring when moving to Cuenca?

People living in Cuenca were asked what three things they wish they had brought and three they wish they had left behind. They wrote:

"The very first thing I thought about that I was missing was a good all natural soap for my skin. Until I found out the pharmacies have good soap at a reasonable price I was shopping in grocery stores. Also, I needed a good water bottle that was NOT plastic. Much of what is in Ecuador is plastic and it is not the good kind. On my last trip to the US I brought an aluminum bottle with me. Glass is heavy to carry around. Lastly, I would have brought more warm sweaters. It does not get usually very cold here but the past winter has been really chilly and my plants are my weather forecasters. They let me know right away....Too Cold," remarked another expat living in Cuenca, Ecuador.

"I wish I had brought: Electric blanket, Thermos, underwear, More vitamins. I wish I had left: Dress shoes, Dress clothes, Sweaters," added another expat in Cuenca.

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Will I be able to find a job in Cuenca?

When we asked people about industries and career opportunities in Cuenca, they reponded:

"I see now by answering these questions the gap between the indigenous population and the expats. I live in a rural area where it is mostly indigenous. Therefore my broken Spanish attempts and there attempt at English too, is lots of fun, and educative. Good thing I have all kinds of dictionaries and grammar books on hand. The main industries in this city are as in the states. The telephone company does a really good business. People there are all Ecuadorian, well educated and some speak perfect Engish, to my relief so I can learn about my new phone. Transportation is a big industry. Cabs are really economical and the drivers have cell phones and maps because it is not easy to know all of the districts and exact streets. It's not laid out like Manhattan," added another expat in Cuenca.

"Teaching English. It is very hard (as in impossible) to earn a living in Cuenca. Salaries are pathetic - maybe $750/month for a full-time gig. I teach English 10 hour/week for $10/hour. DO NOT COME TO ECUADOR if you need to work to pay your bills," remarked another expat who made the move to Cuenca.

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What is life like in Cuenca?

When we asked people living in Cuenca what life is like and how people spend their time, they said:

"Lives in this city seem to revolve around interest in where they live, apartment or house, rented or owned. I am sure most people have some kind of work, as some have written books or are expert in helping residents through their years of professional therapies and other businesses throughout their lives. Most are retired, and probably none are really rich because there is a lot of advice on how to live on your social security each month, Socializing seems to be happening within the events mentioned above. Since I am one of the older ones, I signed up for Kinesthetic Balance and Movement. I met a woman there who was kind enoug to walk me for about a half mile to my bus stop. Since the city is laid out around traffic circles and many small streets, with a few big avenues connecting the extreme edges of the city, it is really difficult to figure out for oneself, as a newcomer, what any given address entails. I have just "discovered" the URL for bus lines, and all of their stops. There are a half dozen bus lines each having a bunch of buses that are numbered. So when I leave my rural neighborhood, I have a choice of two bus lines. I note the stops, and so I only know how to get to El Centro for shopping, and to my Spanish class in the opposite direction, using one of the two bus lines. Every address entails a house number which reads like this (7-733) for example. It might say Ave such and such 7-733 y *which means and & in Spanish) and it gives the cross street. Most important places like hospitals give maps to tell you how to get there by car or transportation. Sports seems to be mainly hiking, but there are gyms and workouts. Specific sports, like classical music events, must pass between people particularly interested in those sports or music. I have not seen much, perhaps soccer, but I pass over those events," commented one expat who made the move to Cuenca.

"Family, church and family, in that order. You will never be a part of that. Get used to it," remarked another expat living in Cuenca, Ecuador.

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What do expats in Cuenca appreciate most about the local culture?

"Can you deposit the $42,500 in a cooperative and do the people like $2.00 bills. As an aside—I heard that it rains most afternoons in Cuenca which has the most English speaking Ecuadoreans and the most expats from North America," mentioned another expat in Ecuador.

"The people are really sweet, especially if you try to speak Spanish. The cost of living is low, although not as low as various websites would have you believe. WATCH OUT! The amazingly tiny sums you can spend here require you to live like an Ecuadorian, so ask yourself when was the last time you considered a single chicken drumstick to constitute a dinner portion? And yes, rents are low - $300 or so, but trust me, you want to spend at least $600 per month until you get the lay of the land and maybe after that. What I appreciate the most about Cuenca is that I truly do not need to own a car. You would not believe how cool it is not to have a smoking monster sucking on my wallet. I can walk anywhere, which is a big part of why I have lost weight since arriving," commented one expat who made the move to Cuenca.

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What do expats find most challenging?

"The family orientation means that newcomers are effectively shut out of local society. If you don't become fluent in Spanish and get involved in the local economy somehow, you will forever live in a gringo bubble. Ecuadorians are short people - I would guess the average man is about 5'5", the woman 5'. It's just weird being so much taller than everyone around you - it can be a little creepy. The streets are not safe - I'm not talking about crime here - I'm referring to the state of the sidewalks and curbs. YOU WILL HURT YOUR BACK AT SOME :POINT WHILE YOU ADJUST TO THIS REALITY. Not a day goes by that I do not encounter a situation presenting an unreasonable risk of personal injury that would not be allowed to persist in the US. Ecuadorian businesses overtly discriminate on the basis of age and sex. It is jarring to see an ad for a professional accounting position that specifies the job is offered only to females under the age of 30. Now, I know many of the persons reading this are thinking that they have no intention of seeking a job in Ecuador, but they need to consider the type of mindset that this evidences and decide if they will be amenable to this attitude generally as it pervades all of Ecuadorian culture. You need to set your watch back 50 years to move here," mentioned another expat in Cuenca.

"My Spanish - when caught off-guard, or in the early morning, my language ability (Spanish, but to a degree, English as well :-) fails and I am floundering. By afternoon, all is well," commented one expat who made the move to Cuenca.

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Is there a lot of crime in Cuenca?

We asked people if there is a lot of crime. They answered:

"No. Ecuador is unusual in having a VERY low crime rate and Cuenca is the best in the country. The risk rate here is the same as Ohio which is much higher than Quebec but ok for us. No place in this city you can't walk day or night. Other cities (Quito and Guayaquil,) have risky spots we are told," mentioned another expat in Cuenca.

"With the collapse of Venezuela’s economy, we have many desperate people who have come to Ecuador. As a result there are now beggars and crime has increased," commented one expat who made the move to Cuenca.

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Is there a lot of diversity? Are people in Cuenca accepting of differences?

"There are significant numbers of the diverse groups. It was one of the first things my Spanish teacher listed on the board. She listed 25% egroupo ethnico and 7% indigenous. The Ecuadorian history, which encompasses the last 11,000 years, reaches into the present; 25 percent of Ecuador's population is of indigenous heritage, while another 70 percent is of mixed indigenous and European heritage. Most people seem to be part of a large number of different Christian churches and organizations, mostly posted in Gringo Post on Friday. That is where I get my idea about this. I am Jewish, and do not follow Orthodox here, but I studied Torah for a year and a half in the US with a Chabad educational group who was Orthodox. I learned that praying for peace and keeping a good feeling about life is not only healthy but productive. I have learned to proportion my hours better to accomplish what I need to do as an artist. I do not know who is accepting of differences. I live in a rural area and I don't talk about being Jewish. Very few people in any general population, religious or not, know anything about what being Jewish means. It's best to fit in with the population at large and not stress any differences, although I do put information on my Facebook page because I keep the friends I had in Berkeley. As a young person and being of Italian heritage, I am well aware of the beauty of music and art in the history of Christianity. I celebrate holidays of all religions and ethnic groups! I don't speak Spanish yet, but I sense that the Ecuadorian people are very accepting, quite attentive and interesting. The people I have contact with are appreciative of the arts, are skilled in labors such as carpentry, although most houses here are made of cement. The Americans here, are just, well American, diverse and educated. I was in a copy shop today and the kids there were using the computers. When they finished they came over to see my portrait copies, and one grade school boy spoke to me in English. He was probably a really good student learning language at that age," mentioned another expat in Cuenca.

"Race means nothing here. The quechua keep to themselves. The fact that I am a gringo only means the cab drivers will occasionally try to rip me off - classic gringo pricing. Fortunately, my wife is Ecuadorian, so that doesn't fly," commented one expat who made the move to Cuenca.

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William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.
William Russell Health InsuranceExpat Health Insurance in Ecuador

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.
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What are the pros and cons of living in Cuenca?

Expats, digital nomads and retirees living in Cuenca responded:

"I love living in Ecuador. Low cost of living, low taxes, great medical, great fresh produce at very low prices and very family friendly Hispanic values," remarked another expat in Cuenca.

"Likes: temperate climate, cost of living, beautiful and clean UNESCO city, fresh fruits, vegetables, meats, and clean (drinkable from the tap!) water, friendly, welcoming Ecuadorians, city's architecture, 4 rivers that run through Cuenca, great restaurants, ease of making friends, safe environment with extremely low crime rates, great health care and excellent doctors / medical staff, huge variety of social activities available, reasonably priced health insurance, multiple transportation options (city and outside of city buses, taxis, tranvia, tour guides, walking, biking), Ecuador uses the US dollar for currency, lots of low priced apartments and houses available for rent/purchase - many designed to satisfy North American standards, a plethora of beautiful parks with exercise equipment and many biking / hiking paths, shopping malls, grocery stories, tiendas (small, individually owned stores/markets), vendor markets, specialty stores, laid-back environment, mountains, etc., etc., etc.! Dislikes: Most Ecuadorian pet owners do not sterilize their animals and there is an overpopulation of unwanted pets on the streets, cranky "entitled gringos" who moved here but make no attempt to embrace / be part of the Ecuadorian way of life, the difficulty for me to learn to speak/understand and communicate the Spanish language (very frustrating!!)," added one expat living in Cuenca.

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William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.
William Russell Health InsuranceExpat Health Insurance in Ecuador

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.
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What type of social life can someone expect in Cuenca?

When we asked expats and global nomads about their social experiences in Cuenca, they replied:

"I try to not limit social interactions to other exists but rather immerse with the licals," said an expat in Cuenca.

"I was not interested in engaging the gringo community, rather to more immerse myself in the local culture. But when we do go out (limited for the past year) we know many places to go, many places to try based on good referrals," remarked another expat in Cuenca.

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"I'm 71, I've lived here for nearly nine years since retirement from Boeing in Seattle, WA. The people are very simple, mostly very undereducated. They are perhaps the hardest working people I have known. It doesn't mean the quality is great, but they are hard workers. Fresh produce is readily available. Ecuador can easily feed itself, that is a plus. We use the US dollar, and the Walmart dollars are most especially handy! Drop a double saw on somebody and they will freak out. Once you establish yourself as a neighbor (commonly seen out walking), customer, etc. the local world begins to open up to you. It is sort of like Las Vegas, you can get anything you want, if you know where to go. The reference of twenty years difference in advancement applies in general. The truth lies much deeper and gets back to the undereducated reference above. In the pandemic with the loss of jobs there is some increase in crime. This is the petty theft type, however, weapons have started to appear. We do not worry about walking the streets at night, well lit areas of course, that's just common sense. The bottom line is we aren't leaving. Life is much better here than in the USA. Houses don't need furnaces or air conditioning. No bugs, no snakes:)," commented one expat living in Cuenca, Ecuador.

"I cannot relate to many expats here in Cuenca. I prefer to have friends who speak Spanish and most expats do not," remarked another expat living in Cuenca.

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What advice to expats in Cuenca have about housing?

"Although I did not plan to buy a house when I moved here, after a year I did buy a house and an very glad I did," commented one expat who moved to Cuenca.

"Dirt is expensive here. You would think that in a "remote" area of the mountains and a minimum wage less than $500 a month the prices would be more like East St. Louis than Issaquah, WA, but they are more like Issaquah. Automobiles, anything imported, is very expensive," said another expat.

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What are medical services in Cuenca like?

When we asked expats and global nomads about the quality of medical care in Cuenca, they replied:

"Don't come down here looking for a miracle cure for your ails. You would find the experience frustrating and assistance costs would wipe out the advantage I think. I do know from some other gringos, and gringo sites, that some medications are not available here, I don't have that experience," remarked another expat living in Cuenca.

"Health insurance is required of expats living in Ecuador. We didn't have to use any emergency health facilities, but in general, our friends were satisfied with the quality of care. It was nice to visit a doctor and be treated directly by her at a reasonable price. We got a reduced rate for our perscriptions through our insurance. Many of our perscriptions are "over-the-counter" in Ecuador," said one expat living in Cuenca.

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Are healthcare and health insurance expensive in Cuenca?

"Private health insurance here is a fraud. The only people buying it are US expats who were trained that you need it in the States. Here, health care is so cheap that you will NEVER recover your premiums. Example - insurance quoted me $400/mo insurance. I just spent 2 weeks in the hospital in a private room with excellent care, and the total cost (no insurance used) was just over $5,000. IOW, one year of premium to pay for 2 weeks hospital, Unless you are in the hospital a LOT, you are better off self-insuring (as we do)," added one expat living in Cuenca.

"I would pay out of pocket if it were still available, because doctors are cheap. With my cheap insurance, I will still have to pay out of pocket and maybe get reimbursement if I'm lucky. Insurance here is a government sponsored racket, as whenever government requires something the drops and prices go up, that's why governments do it. If it were a service people actually wanted it wouldn't be required," commented one expat who moved to Cuenca.

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William Russell Health Insurance

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

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William Russell Health Insurance

William Russell's private medical insurance will cover you and your family wherever you may be. Whether you need primary care or complex surgery, you'll have access to the best hospitals & doctors available. Unlike some insurers, we also include medical evacuation and mental health cover in our plans (except SilverLite). Get a quote from our partner, William Russell.

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Is the cost of living in Cuenca high?

We asked people about the cost of living in Cuenca, they wrote:

"Prices are and product availability and servicing is changing rapidly. Though many things have always been cheaper (food and lodging) technological products were very dear 10+ years ago, they are not now. I bought a new computer yesterday and the price (with a bit of shopping) was 5% more expensive for the same thing on Amazon.com. us. I double-checked, all specifications. That being said, if you are looking for a city and country cheaper than Cuenca, there are plenty. They simply will be far less fun," remarked another expat living in Cuenca.

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About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

El Puente Roto (Broken Bridge) in Cuenca, Ecuador

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