Expat Exchange
Costinesti, Romania

Retire in Romania

By Joshua Wood, LPC

Last updated on Nov 27, 2021

Summary: What is it like to retire in Romania? Retirees share their experiences living in Romania.

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How do I meet people in Romania?

When we asked people living in Romania about club and activities where newcomers can meet others, they responded:

"There are loads of sports and interest clubs throughout Romania that Romanians put a great deal of effort and time into. Personaly I joined the ranks of ski tourers in the Brasov area and was welcomed most warmly until I became part of the furniture. In the future I plan to join the voluntary Salvamont (mountain rescue) this is open to all I think that like hiking and repainting the trail signs, Get stuck in whatever you're into and I'm sure you'll find others likeminded and open hearted," commented one retiree living in Moieciu de Jos, Romania.

"To be honest the ex-pat community in Constanta are not very obvious. I know a couple of people who I have net through work but otherwise there doesn't seem to be nay organised meetings. My company does provide some information on groups and meetings but they are all for Bucharest. The ex-pat support for Constanta has been negligible," explained one retiree living in Constanta.

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What is life like in Romania?

When we asked people living in Romania what life is like and how people spend their time, they said:

"In my village life revolves around construction work both home and abroad and subsistance farming. Also tourism through small guest house businesses. Its a rural existence based historically and culturally in agriculture. In my circle of Friends (mostly from Brasov) it's about family and exploring our mountains," explained one retiree living in Moieciu de Jos.

"The Romanians I work with are pleasant, well mannered individuals. Getting used to the different work ethic was difficult at first but after some cultural training and getting used to the way things work it is getting easier. The majority of locals that I have met have been self centered. Manners are rare especially in public, unless you pay for them. I have found this probably one of the most frustrating things. I have been raised to be courteous and I find most Romanians that I don't know tend to be discourteous. Examples are driving, I have been told by my Romanian cultural advisor that many Romanians buy their driving licenses rather than sit the exam. This is evident after a drive through a town or city centre. Drivers pull out on you, rude, cut you up, also rude. Another example is smoking, I see a lot of families in restaurants with young children. The adults smoke, breathing cigarette smoke all over their children. I appreciate that they don't give a hoot about me and my meal but to submit their children to smoke is unacceptable. If you follow a Romanian through a door be careful of it hitting you in the face," said another retiree in living in Constanta, Romania.

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What do I need to know before retiring in Romania?

When we asked people what advice they would give someone preparing to move to Romania, they said:

"You absolutely need to be speaking Romanian to some descent level or you'll struggle. This is the country side, not much English spoken or anything else. You will find some English spoken in Bran and far more commonly in Brasov," explained one retiree living in Moieciu de Jos.

"Think very carefully about the move. Ask your company to provide details of their ex-pat support program before you move. Come on a familiarisation visit before you come. Constanta is a lot better developed that I imagined but there is limited ex-pat activity. I spent 3 months before I came here trying to get detailed information on the town and not a lot of information is available," said another retiree in living in Constanta, Romania.

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About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

Costinesti, Romania

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