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Moving to Ronda, Spain | Expat Exchange
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Moving to Ronda, Spain

By Joshua Wood, LPC

Last updated on May 01, 2024

Summary: Moving to Ronda, Spain: Expats, retirees and digital nomads talk about everything you need to know before moving to Ronda.

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What do I need to know before moving to Ronda?

When we asked people what advice they would give someone preparing to move to Ronda, they said:

"Ronda is a small city located in the Spanish province of Malaga, known for its historic charm, stunning landscapes, and rich culture. Before moving to Ronda, expats should know that the official language is Spanish, so it would be beneficial to learn the language or at least basic phrases. The cost of living in Ronda is generally lower than in larger Spanish cities, but it's still important to budget accordingly. Ronda has a Mediterranean climate with hot summers and mild winters, so pack your wardrobe accordingly. The city is famous for its historic sites, including the Puente Nuevo bridge and the Plaza de Toros, one of the oldest bullrings in Spain. It's also surrounded by natural parks, making it a great place for outdoor activities. Healthcare in Spain is of a high standard, and expats will have access to both public and private healthcare facilities. However, it's recommended to have health insurance to cover any medical costs. The city is safe, but like any other place, it's important to take standard precautions to protect yourself and your belongings. Public transportation in Ronda is limited, so having a car can be beneficial, especially if you plan to explore the surrounding areas. However, the city itself is quite walkable. The cuisine in Ronda, like the rest of Spain, is a highlight, with tapas bars and restaurants serving local dishes. The pace of life in Ronda is slower than in larger cities, which can be a big change for some expats. It's also worth noting that siestas are common in Ronda, with many businesses closing in the afternoon for a few hours. Finally, it's important to understand and respect the local customs and traditions, which include festivals like the Feria de Pedro Romero in September," commented one expat who made the move to Ronda.

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About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.

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