×
Interested in our Partner Program for businesses or our Local Guide Program for experienced expats and digital nomads? Click here to learn more.
Expat Exchange - Cost of Living in Boracay Island 2024
Expat Exchange
Free MembershipSign In
Borocay Island, Philippines


Cost of Living in Boracay Island

By Joshua Wood, LPC

Mondly by Pearson
Mondly by Pearson

Summary: If you're moving to Boracay Island, understanding the the cost of living in Boracay Island helps you know what to expect when it comes to apartment or house hunting, grocery shopping, transportation, dining out, utilities and more.

Category Cost
Apartment Rentals A one-bedroom apartment in the city center of Boracay Island can cost around PHP 15,000 to PHP 25,000 per month. A three-bedroom apartment in the same area can cost around PHP 30,000 to PHP 50,000 per month.
Apartment Purchases The price of apartments in Boracay Island can vary greatly depending on the location and size. A one-bedroom apartment can cost anywhere from PHP 3 million to PHP 5 million. A three-bedroom apartment can cost anywhere from PHP 6 million to PHP 10 million.
Transportation Public transportation in Boracay Island is relatively cheap. A one-way ticket on local transport can cost around PHP 20. A monthly pass can cost around PHP 1,000. Taxis start at around PHP 40, plus PHP 13 per kilometer. Gasoline costs around PHP 52 per liter.
Groceries The cost of groceries in Boracay Island is relatively low. A liter of milk costs around PHP 90, a loaf of bread costs around PHP 60, a dozen eggs costs around PHP 90, and a kilogram of local cheese costs around PHP 400. Fruits and vegetables are also quite affordable, with a kilogram of apples costing around PHP 120 and a kilogram of potatoes costing around PHP 60.
Restaurants A meal at an inexpensive restaurant can cost around PHP 200 to PHP 300. A three-course meal for two people at a mid-range restaurant can cost around PHP 1,000 to PHP 2,000. A regular cappuccino costs around PHP 100 to PHP 150.
Utilities Basic utilities for an 85m2 apartment, including electricity, heating, cooling, water, and garbage, can cost around PHP 4,000 to PHP 6,000 per month. Internet (60 Mbps or more, unlimited data, cable/ADSL) can cost around PHP 1,500 to PHP 2,000 per month.
Private School Tuition Private school tuition can vary greatly depending on the school. Preschool can cost around PHP 50,000 to PHP 100,000 per year. Elementary school can cost around PHP 100,000 to PHP 200,000 per year. Middle school and high school can cost around PHP 150,000 to PHP 300,000 per year.
Please note that these are average costs and actual costs may vary. The cost of living in Boracay Island is generally lower than in major cities in the Philippines like Manila and Cebu. However, due to its status as a popular tourist destination, some things like restaurant meals and apartment rentals can be more expensive than in less touristy areas.

Monthly Budget for Retirees in Boracay Island

"The cost of living in Boracay Island is considered moderate compared to other tourist destinations in the country. Rent for a one-bedroom apartment in the city center can be quite expensive, while those outside the city center are more affordable. The cost of utilities such as electricity, heating, cooling, and water is also relatively high due to the island's remote location. Groceries in Boracay can be more expensive than in other parts of the Philippines, especially for imported goods. Local produce and products, however, are reasonably priced. Eating out in Boracay varies greatly, with local food stalls offering cheap meals, while high-end restaurants can be quite pricey. Public transportation in Boracay is relatively cheap, with tricycles being the most common mode of transport. However, renting a car or a motorbike can be quite expensive. Healthcare in Boracay is affordable but the facilities are not as advanced or comprehensive as those in larger cities. It's recommended to have health insurance that covers medical evacuation, in case of serious illness or injury. Leisure activities in Boracay can range from moderately priced to expensive, depending on the activity. Water sports and boat tours tend to be on the pricier side. Overall, while Boracay can be more expensive than other parts of the Philippines, it's still considered affordable compared to many Western countries. However, the cost can add up quickly for expats or long-term visitors, especially if they maintain a Western lifestyle," said one expat living in Boracay Island.

Can I live in Boracay Island on $1,500 a month?

"I've been living in Boracay Island for a few years now and I can tell you that it's definitely possible to live comfortably on $1,500 a month, but it does require some adjustments. The cost of living here is relatively low compared to many Western countries, but it's still higher than in other parts of the Philippines due to its popularity as a tourist destination. The biggest expense is likely to be accommodation. If you want to live in the more popular areas like White Beach or Bulabog Beach, you could easily spend half of your budget or more on rent. However, there are more affordable options if you're willing to live a bit further out. I live in Manoc-Manoc, which is a bit more local and less touristy, and I pay around $300 a month for a decent one-bedroom apartment. You could also consider Yapak or Balabag, which are a bit more expensive but still more affordable than the beachfront areas. Food is relatively cheap, especially if you eat local food. I spend around $200 a month on groceries and eating out. Utilities like electricity and internet can be a bit pricey, especially if you use air conditioning a lot. I spend around $100 a month on utilities. Transportation is cheap, especially if you use the local tricycles. I spend around $50 a month on transportation. The rest of my budget goes to entertainment, personal care, and miscellaneous expenses. The biggest sacrifice is probably giving up some of the conveniences and luxuries you might be used to. For example, while you can find most things you need here, certain imported goods can be expensive or hard to find. Also, while the internet has improved a lot in recent years, it can still be unreliable at times. But overall, I find the lower cost of living and the laid-back island lifestyle to be worth it," commented an expat living in Boracay Island.

Can I live in Boracay Island on $3,500 a month?

"I've been living in Boracay Island for a few years now and I can tell you that living on $3,000 a month is definitely possible, even with a taste for modern amenities. However, you'll need to be smart about your spending. The cost of living here is relatively low compared to Western countries, but it can vary greatly depending on your lifestyle. For instance, if you choose to live in the more touristy areas like White Beach or Bulabog Beach, expect to pay a premium for rent. These areas are packed with resorts, restaurants, and bars, and while they offer a vibrant nightlife and a variety of dining options, they can be quite expensive. On the other hand, areas like Manoc-Manoc or Yapak are more local and less touristy, hence more affordable. You can find a decent apartment or even a small house for rent at a much lower price. As for utilities, they're generally affordable but can spike during the summer months when you might need to use air conditioning more often. Internet service is decent, but not as fast or reliable as you might be used to. You might need to adjust your expectations a bit in that regard. Groceries are relatively cheap, especially if you buy local products. Imported goods can be quite pricey, so you might need to adapt your diet a bit. Eating out can be cheap or expensive depending on where you go. There are plenty of local eateries where you can get a meal for a few dollars, but if you prefer dining in high-end restaurants, it can add up quickly. Transportation is cheap. You can get around the island by tricycle for a few pesos. If you prefer to drive, you can rent a motorbike for a reasonable price. Healthcare is affordable and decent in Boracay. There are several clinics and a hospital on the island. However, for more serious conditions, you might need to go to bigger cities like Iloilo or Manila. In terms of entertainment, there's plenty to do on a budget. The beaches are free, and there are plenty of outdoor activities like hiking, snorkeling, or diving that are reasonably priced. In conclusion, living in Boracay on $3,000 a month is doable, but you'll need to make some adjustments. Choose a less touristy area to live, adapt your diet to local products, and be mindful of your spending on utilities and entertainment. It's all about finding the right balance between comfort and cost," said one expat living in Boracay Island.

Can I live in Boracay Island on $5,000 a month?

"I've been living in Boracay Island for a few years now and I can tell you that living on $5,000 a month is not only possible, but you can live quite comfortably. The cost of living here is significantly lower than in many Western countries. For instance, you can rent a decent apartment or condo in a good neighborhood for around $500 to $1,000 a month. The more upscale neighborhoods like White Beach and Bulabog Beach can be a bit pricier, with rents going up to $2,000 a month or more, so you might want to avoid those if you're on a budget. In terms of utilities, expect to pay around $100 to $200 a month for electricity, water, and internet. Food is also quite affordable. You can eat out at local restaurants for around $5 to $10 per meal, or if you prefer to cook, groceries would cost you around $200 to $300 a month. Transportation is another area where you can save a lot. The island is small and you can get around easily by tricycle or on foot. If you prefer to have your own vehicle, you can rent a motorbike for around $100 a month. Healthcare is also affordable. There are several clinics and a hospital on the island, and a visit to the doctor usually costs around $20 to $30. If you need more specialized care, you can go to the larger hospitals in Kalibo or Iloilo City, which are a few hours away by boat and bus. As for entertainment, there's plenty to do on the island that doesn't cost much. You can enjoy the beautiful beaches, go hiking, or take part in water sports like diving and kiteboarding. There are also plenty of bars and clubs where you can enjoy the nightlife. The main sacrifice you might have to make is in terms of shopping. There are not many big stores or shopping malls on the island, so if you're used to having a wide variety of goods and brands to choose from, you might have to adjust your expectations. However, you can find most basic necessities and there are also several online shopping options that deliver to the island. Overall, I'd say that living in Boracay Island on $5,000 a month is quite doable and you can enjoy a comfortable lifestyle without having to make too many sacrifices," commented an expat living in Boracay Island.

About the Author

Joshua Wood Joshua Wood, LPC joined Expat Exchange in 2000 and serves as one of its Co-Presidents. He is also one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. Prior to Expat Exchange, Joshua worked for NBC Cable (MSNBC and CNBC Primetime). Joshua has a BA from Syracuse and a Master's in Clinical and Counseling Psychology from Fairleigh Dickinson University. Mr. Wood is also a licensed counselor and psychotherapist.

Some of Joshua's articles include Pros and Cons of Living in Portugal, 10 Best Places to Live in Ireland and Pros and Cons of Living in Uruguay. Connect with Joshua on LinkedIn.


Mondly by Pearson
Mondly by Pearson

Mondly by Pearson
Mondly by Pearson

Borocay Island, Philippines

GeoBlue
GeoBlue

Top-quality coverage for people who live, work, study and travel internationally.
Get Quote

GeoBlueGeoBlue

Top-quality coverage for people who live, work, study and travel internationally.
Get Quote

Contribute to Philippines Network Contribute
Help others in Philippines by answering questions about the challenges and adventures of living in Philippines.

Mondly by Pearson
Mondly by Pearson

Copyright 1997-2024 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal Partners & Local Guides