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A reader commented on the Expat Report Having a Baby in Dublin, Ireland
Having-a-Baby-in-Dublin
Describe your experience giving birth there. What type of facility did you go to? What (if any) type of pain management did you use? How long did you stay in the hospital? Was it a positive experience? Etc...
The Coombe Hospital

I went as a public patient for my first baby. I received ante-natal care at Naas hospital, which has a program run by Coombe midwives. I will be going there again for my second child due in Dec 2008. I wouldn't know which other hospital to choose as I live in Co. Kildare. Coombe is the closest. A i had tested positive for GBS weeks earlier, I got a private birthing room as I'd have to be put on antibiotics. I was shocked to find the bathroom there dirty with bloody sanitary towels and blood on the toilets. No hurry to clean it up for me. The midwives were very good to me and checked in on me often. The doctor ended up using forceps and I got the dreadded episiostimy (which almost everyone whom I know has given birth here got, and have since found out it was invented here in the 1800s!!!). My sister who is a nurse in the USA says they massage they perineal area during labour in the US, which they do not do here. They cut it and don't think twice about using foreceps or a ventouse. I was allowed to start breastfeeding as soon as my son was born. The midwives seemed quite happy that I was confident about doing it. Then I was put into the public ward which was pretty terrible. There were 8 women and 8 babies in the room on the 1st night. I barely got any sleep and wanted to leave but couldn't as my baby had to receive the GBS antibiotics for 72 hours. The nures that came into check on us were either very helpful or stand-offish. One Filipino nurse tried to encourage me to give my baby a bottle of formula each night. She said he would sleep better and get more milk this way. She didn't seem to know much or care about breastfeeding. I finally gave her into one night and thats when I found out my oon had a milk allergy. Yippee!!! No more formula for him! Many Irish women though do not even attempt breastfeeding and the nurses are always going on about how you have a choice. Again, was shocked and sickened at the dirty bathrooms. Maybe 8 stalls in the bathroom and most toilets covered in blood and dirty sanitary napkins sitting on top of the bins. Nobody bothers to flush their toilet. Couldn't wait to get out of there and am dreading the next time I go. Had a big shock when I visited my sister in her room in the States after she had given birth. Room to herself, computer there, big window with view of the Rockies, and peaceful and quiet! (Continue)

A reader replied most recently with:
Kindly guide me on how to contact a doctor in dublin for giving birth there. This is my contact nello306@yahoo.com. Thanks from Dorathy
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A reader commented on the Expat Report Culture Shock in Dublin, Ireland
Culture-Shock-in-Dublin
What are some things you appreciate most about the new culture?
Quality of friendships (once made). Kindness and helpfulness of friends. Fascinating to learn about a new culture and to learn Irish history, of which there is an extraordinary amount!!! So many places to see going back through time. In a few days you can take a visitor to ancient ruins (3000-5000 years old), historic castles and abbeys from 1100s, Viking outposts, Book of Kells from the 400s? 500s?, you can walk down a sidewalk and see a Celtic cross next to a cafe that is from 800 AD, loads of castles from the 1700s and 1800s, lovely gardens, incredible natural scenery. And lots of green hills and sheep of course! (Continue)
A reader replied most recently with:
I'm from Ireland, left when I was 32' . I'm 53 now and living in San Francisco . Love both places, I go back to Ireland for a month every year. This report is very interesting for an Irishman to hear. I do think Irish people make friends very quickly when we are abroad, we talk a lot, and most Americans know something about our culture. Unfortunately the pub culture there, while good fun, has led to a lot of social problems.
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Expat Report Info about International Women's Club of Dublin in Dublin, Ireland was published
Info-about-Dublin
Describe your group.
IWCD is a social club for international women to build a network within Dublin. It is open to women of every nationality looking to meet new friends, socialize and take part in the many activities we organise. The club has over 280 members, consisting of 47+ nationalities. (Continue)
A reader commented on the Expat Report Having a Baby in Dublin, Ireland
Having-a-Baby-in-Dublin
Describe your experience giving birth there. What type of facility did you go to? What (if any) type of pain management did you use? How long did you stay in the hospital? Was it a positive experience? Etc...
The Coombe Women's Hospital.

Deplorable.

Staff attitudes from the 50s. This is the country that pioneered the medically managed model of birthcare, and they've not changed a lot since. Prenatal care is better and more personable for dairy cattle and don't even ask about postnatal care.

The only breastfeeding mothers I saw for the 5 day duration of my stay were foreign, like me. The hospital provided breastfeeding classes which were utterly laughable, and otherwise treated us like the lowest, most loathsome, stupid, and aggravating people in the ward. How *dare* we breastfeed and room in with our infants?

If you want birth-trauma, or a cesarean, you're in the right place. If you want a natural birth with personal attention, forget it. (Continue)

A reader replied most recently with:
Yep. That about sums it up. I have only one child for this very reason.
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A reader commented on the Expat Report Review of Castle Park School in Dublin, Ireland
Review-of-Castle Park School
How would you describe the facilities at this school? What extra-curricular activities are available?
Excellent. A choice of 40 "hobbies" or extra curricular activities, taken both during and after school.

A private school. Originally a Presbyterian school, but all faiths are made to feel welcome and there is Communion class for Catholics. (Yes this matters in Ireland as every school teaches religion there).

The pre-school program is Montessori based and excellent. Starts at age 3.

We relocated our home to be closer to this school. There are only a few private "international" choices in Dublin. The others would be St. Andrews in Blackrock (Dublin), The German School in Clonskeagh (Dublin) and the International School in Ballsbridge (Dublin). Those are the ones that come to mind initially. (Continue)

A reader replied most recently with:
Hi all, This school is on the top of our list to consider for our move in April 2013. Any current updates and comments would be appreciated. We are currently in an International School in London UK, originally from Canada. My son would be entering Form1 Prep. Thanks.
ausmum replied recently with:
As an Australian mother with two boys in Castle Park, one in the Montessori dept, one in the Prep dept, I would have to agree with this report. The school has provided an excellent education with many opportunities. The school is small (approx. 2 classes per grade) and encourages interaction between the various years. Its also important to note that CP is a co-educational facility (which is not common in Ireland). The current facilities are 2 years old (after refurbishment and expansion).
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Expat Report Culture Shock in Dublin, Ireland was published
Culture-Shock-in-Dublin
Do you have any advice or thoughts about culture shock you would like to share?
Build your bubble, try to make friends, find yourself a routine, try something new you wouldn't have tried back home, dedicate time to learn the local language, be humble everywhere you go, listen before talking, and when things are rough, give yourself a gift, greet yourself. (Continue)
A reader commented on the Expat Report Christmas In Dublin, Ireland
Christmas-In-Dublin
If locals celebrate Christmas or Hanukkah where you are living now, how is it celebrated differently?
I was there upon arival of a layover from my aer lingus flight. We took a double decker bus (3.80 Euros for 1 adult 2 children one way) to the city Centre THe center is Lovely at night! They have a beautiful gigantic Illuminated Christmas tree! It sparkles 1st red then green,then blue!

The people were for the most part friendly, but they like to exagerate a bit if they tell you for instance there's a bus, believe them -- just don't expect it at the time they tell you...that sort of things so know your directions there.

THe main street is large and people are everywhere its quiet ...except we wittnessed a dispute between an resturaunt owner and a customer...the customer yelled out a foul phrase re the man's business and the man slowly left repeating obsenities and then threw small pebbles at the owner and he threw some back and they yelled about how bad the other was.... a man in a business suit passed by and chuckled I guess there was a police crew but it faded fast...all very exciting to me!

It was a lovely experience. I would go!!!! again!!! (Continue)

A reader replied most recently with:
I'm rather cheeesd off that I was also a Dubliner. I agree with their interpretation of "me," I suppose, as a laid-back European type, Pub-crawling sort of person... But the city itself is awful.Give me Edinburgh, any day.Guinness, however, is the pint of choice.-- Tuckmac
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Expat Report Review of Hartstown secondary school in Dublin, Ireland was published
Review-of-Hartstown secondary school
How would you describe the facilities at this school? What extra-curricular activities are available?
Rugby, soccer, hurling, tennis, drama, basketball, chess, art, music and more that I am not sure of. (Continue)
Expat Report Review of Soupstone kindergarten in Dublin, Ireland by lcox was published
Review-of-Soupstone kindergarten
How would you describe the facilities at this school? What extra-curricular activities are available?
Parents built the kindergarten themselves and are currently working on the garden area, so are rightly proud of the place - everyone who sees it loves it! (Continue)
suziehol commented on the Expat Report Moving to Dublin, Ireland
Moving-to-Dublin
What advice would you give someone preparing to move to your area about the actual move, choosing a neighborhood and finding a home?
Renters only have to give one months notice so potential homes won't come onto the market till they are ready (or nearly ready) to be leased. Find out what the different types of houses are like; terraced, semi detached etc. Think about your lifestyle, would you like to be near the beach, a park, the DART (Dublin's main transport system, your office, kids school etc.... Know that Dublin's traffic jams are are really bad and getting worse, a 15 minute journey on a sunday morning can take an hour and a half during the week!The bus system is hopeless, the Dart is more reliable. It's always worth investing time and money on a reconnaissance trip before moving. (Continue)
suziehol replied most recently with:
If you wanted to check out some areas in Dublin before you settle down, you could try staying in a homestay?http://www.homestay.com/ireland/dublin We have homestays all over the city, so you could see if you enjoy living by the coast in Portmarnock or in the foothills of Dublin mountains in Rathfarnham.
Bradleysmimi replied recently with:
What about the rain? Does it still rain everyday? Does it normally stop raining everyday in the Spring and Summer or not? Also, are there any single people trying to rent part of their home or isn't that common there, say in the southern area, southwest of Cork? Lynne M.
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Expat Report Moving to Dublin, Ireland was published
Moving-to-Dublin
What advice would you give someone preparing to move to your area about the actual move, choosing a neighborhood and finding a home?
Do your research. Do not by, the market here is way overvalued. (Continue)

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