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An Expat Talks about What is Was Like Having a Baby in Rome, Italy

Submitted by Linades

What is the name of the city or town that you are reporting on?

Rome

How recently did you give birth in the country that you are reporting on?

1 year ago

Describe your experience giving birth there. What type of facility did you go to? What (if any) type of pain management did you use? How long did you stay in the hospital? Was it a positive experience? Etc...

It was really positive experience. I gave birth to my daughter to one of the largest public hospitals of Rome - Gemelli and I definitely recommend it to everybody. It is free, delivery room is private and huge with a toilet and shower etc. There was 5 members of the staff with me, including 2 students on practice. Everyone was really nice, caring and professional. As I had a spontaneous birth-giving, I couldn't use any anesthesia, so no experience there. But a couple of weeks before, I had a meeting with anesthesiologist in the same hospital, signed all the papers, and had all things explained, really useful. Almost all doctors there are English-speaking, such a relief! The maternity rooms are semi-private, with a toilet and the shower, and the nursery is next-door. They taking the babies away only for the tests and for the night, from 12 till 6, but if you'll ask, the nurses will leave the baby with you the whole night. The nurses are professional and helpful, you can always ask for the help in changing, brest-feeding etc.

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How did you choose your doctor, midwife or other type of medical professional?

Word of mouth is a key in Italy. Ask me if you need a good English-speaking gynecologist or pediatrician.

If you were to have another child in this country, would you do anything differently in terms of preparation and/or the delivery?

Absolutely the same. In fact, I'm already doing it.

If a friend of yours living in the same country were expecting, what advice would you give her?

Don't waste your time and money on private clinics. Maybe they will have nicer looking reception and not so many people waiting, but the best professionals are working in large state hospitals, best equipment end supplies are there either. One of my friends had a horrible experience in one of the most popular private clinics - Artemisia.

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On the Italy Expat Forum

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Swapping Visa for a Permesso (2 replies)

Hi, Anyone swapped another EU country 1 year visa for an Italian 1 year visa? My husband and I, two Americans, have a Portuguese Titulo de Residencia, allowing us to live in Portugal for a year and we decided to move to Bari Italy now. An Italian lawyer thought it might be "simple"! I called the Bari INAC for help since they list immigration assistance as one of their services. I think they said they don't help with PDS. Anyone successfully traded in another EU Visa for an Italian one? Anyone else worked with their local INAC for immigration issues? A few other forums mentioned INAC helped them. Thanks

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I'm getting several PM's because of my last post. I don't mind but the subject matter may be valuable for other people on this forum so it would be better to discuss most of this stuff on the forum.

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Why France or Why Italy (7 replies)

Those of you who have been following my posts know that, unlike most of you, my intention has not been to look for a place to settle down. My wife and I, since retirement, have wanted to explore the places that we just touched upon when we were younger and on limited vacations. We went to places and visited the tourist sites and did the tourist things but I was always more interested in what the people that lived there did. We are doing an extended sampling of life in those places. Since 2015, when we first packed our two suitcases and got rid of everything else, we have been in Palermo, Brittany and now Chianti. While we were in Palermo we took a 5 month road trip through western Europe staying for a week or four in various places as far north as the Netherlands. During our stays in various places I developed opinions about those places. Some of them strong opinions. Likes and dislikes, which I have written about before. So the question why Italy over France? Or the other ay around? I love both. For many reasons I prefer one over the other but each takes that role. But it is the negatives that are more important. Palermo is a beautiful city with an incredibly rich history full of people that have great pride in their home city. But those people, not all, are blind to the filth and chaos and animal abuse and third world traffic, which they are the cause of the above. And then there is the heat. Especially the heat. Brittany has fewer negatives. Minor negatives. The winter weather is mild but a bit damp and the summers are cool (which I do not consider a negative). The people are kind and friendly but my lack of ability to speak French makes interactions with the Bretons difficult. The French bureaucracy, as bad as the french say it is, is nothing compared to the Italian system, especially the Sicilian version, where the remnants of nepotism and favoritism are still lurking in the shadows. It is now Chianti's turn. Other than the common language and the common coffee culture, there is little common between Sicily and Tuscany. And there is little common between Brittany and Chianti. And that is the point of exploring. To find those differences and commonalties. I love the French food (farmers) markets. They know how to do it. Italy does not, or rather, they have different needs and their markets reflect that. French markets are all about the quality and variety of the freshest foods. The Italian markets are more focused on cheap clothing and home goods with the food part of the market taking a lesser role and the foods available at those stalls being not much better than what is available in stores. I miss the French markets although the larger, permanent markets, like the Central Market in Florence are decent. We are planning a year in Chianti. After that we don't know yet. We had planned on staying a full year in Saint Pierre Quiberon, Brittany, but the house we were renting had issues. Although it had beautiful views and it was 75 feet from the waters edge, it was a house on four floors with bathrooms on the first floor. My knees could not take anymore. The house, even though it was on four floors was actually too small for us. The house has a very small footprint. But other homes close to the water were just not available. They were either all owned by people who used them as vacation homes or they were only available seasonally at high costs. I was not interested in the interior of Brittany since it was very much like upstate New York where we came from. And my wife wanted to go back to Italy where she could at least understand some of the conversations. So there is a possibility, since Alice does speak some German, that next year it may be a German speaking country. Austria maybe. We'll see.

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Comments about this Report

guest
May 9, 2012 06:27

Dear Linades, I'm in the early stages of pregnancy and going to be meeting with an OB next week who delivers at Gemelli. It'll be our first child (they're actually twins, yay) and I have lots of questions. If you (or anyone else reading this comment) would be so kind as to drop me a personal note, I'd be grateful to ask you a few things that are on my mind. My name is Kim, I can be reached at lombardy.villa@gmail.com Thank you so much!

Expatriate Health Insurance

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Italy from our partner, Cigna Global Health.
Get a Quote

Healthcare in Italy

An overview of the healthcare system in Italy - public and private hospitals, Servizio Sanitario Nazionale (SSN), getting your Tessera Sanitaria (healthcare card), vaccinations for Italy, prescription medication availability and more.

An overview of the healthcare system in Italy - public and private hospitals, Servizio Sanitario Nazionale (SSN), getting your Tessera Sanitaria (healthcare card), vaccinations for Italy, prescription...

5 Expat Moms Talk about Having a Baby in Italy

5 expat moms offer candid insight into what it's like giving birth in Italy - from bringing towels and toilet paper with you to the hospital to being refused pain medication. And, like most advice in Italy, word of mouth is the best way to find a good OB/GYN.

5 expat moms offer candid insight into what it's like giving birth in Italy - from bringing towels and toilet paper with you to the hospital to being refused pain medication. And, like most advice in...

9 Healthcare & Health Insurance Tips for Expats in Italy

Expats in Italy share tips and advice about healthcare and health insurance in Italy. Advice about finding an English-speaking doctor, using The Sistema Sanitario Nazionale (SSN) and more.

Expats in Italy share tips and advice about healthcare and health insurance in Italy. Advice about finding an English-speaking doctor, using The Sistema Sanitario Nazionale (SSN) and more....

Italy Healthcare FAQ

Answers to some of the most commonly asked questions about healthcare and health insurance for expats in Italy.

Healthcare in Arezzo, Italy

Get established with a local doctor before you actually need one--you will need a primary car doctor to refer you to specialists.

Healthcare in Italy

An expat in Italy discusses health care, pharmacies and health insurance costs. She explains that the cost of health insurance is nominal compared to the US and prescription medicine is very inexpens

Healthcare in Italy

To seek a university hospital and or doctors associate with one. To ask the locals for references.

Answer Questions about Healthcare in Italy

Help others moving to Italy by answering a set of questions about health insurance, public healthcare in Italy, prescription medicine, quality of medical care and emergency services.

Having-a-Baby-In-ItalyExpats Talk about What it's Like Having a Baby in Italy

Read recent baby reports submitted for Montesilvano, Pescara and Genoa.

If you're an expat parent who had a baby abroad, write a report about your childbirth experiences to help other expecting expat parents.

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