Panama
Resources
City Guides
JoinSign In

Panama Expat Forum

Pensionado Visa Question

Post New Topic
K11501
6/27/2018 18:59 EST

Hi,

My family and I are looking at relocating to Panama. Husband is retired military and we'd qualify for the pensionada visa. I'm aware of the paperwork required and that I need to allocate 7-10 business days in Panama to submit/apply in person, but I can't find whether there's a # of days required in the country to keep it? We're moving with pets, so ideally I'd like to fly down, apply for the visa and get that moving so that we could return to the States in the interim to deal with selling our house and making moving arrangments. If anyone could give me info on that, it would be great - I found info for # of days in country on the friendly nations visa but not on the pensionada.

Thanks in advance!

Post a Reply

0abuse

profman2
6/27/2018 19:27 EST

From what my wife and I just went through with MAyra our attorney in Panama City, it took us 7 days for the appointments to get our temporary visa. You will definitely want to also get the "multi-entry" visa at the same time if going to the states, otherwise you must stay in Panama for 6 months or until your permanent visa arrives or face a $2000 fine. Mayra made our trip easy and has an excellent help ( I believe it is her daughter, Marianna) at the immigration office who will assist every step of the way while there.

Post a Reply

0abuse

allianz international health insurance

For expats in Panama, choosing an expat health insurance provider is an important decision. Get a quote from our partner, Allianz Care. Their plans ensure that you have access to quality healthcare whenever you need it. Allianz Care's flexible solutions allow you to tailor your cover to meet your needs and budget.

Get a Quote

SAY
6/27/2018 20:18 EST

I f you are pensionado, it is pretty easy Retain a lawyer that makes use of technology. He will send you the list of necessary documents . You can do this from your home country. when you acquire the documents, scan them
into your lawyer, so he can verify their correctness andhave them tra nslated into Spanish. Make an appointed with him to come to Panama, When you get here. find a clinic to give you a health certificate = at least 1 day before you meet your lawyer. Meet your lawyer and he will take you to the immigration office. I did mine in David, which took 1 1/2 hours. I signed some papers, had a picture taken, and walked out with a temporary pensionado visa with multiple entry/exit. I went back to the states. 5 months later, my lawyer notified me that my application had been approved and that I needed to come back to Panama to do the signatures and picture for the permanent pensionado, He recommended that I try to get here in 2 - 3 weeks before my file was moved to the back room, where it could take days to find. I flew in for a day and a half, did the visa paperwork and flew back to the states with my pensionado. I did not move here until 7 months later.
I hope this helps. If you need a lawyer, pm me

Post a Reply

0abuse

SAY
6/27/2018 20:18 EST

I f you are pensionado, it is pretty easy Retain a lawyer that makes use of technology. He will send you the list of necessary documents . You can do this from your home country. when you acquire the documents, scan them
into your lawyer, so he can verify their correctness andhave them tra nslated into Spanish. Make an appointed with him to come to Panama, When you get here. find a clinic to give you a health certificate = at least 1 day before you meet your lawyer. Meet your lawyer and he will take you to the immigration office. I did mine in David, which took 1 1/2 hours. I signed some papers, had a picture taken, and walked out with a temporary pensionado visa with multiple entry/exit. I went back to the states. 5 months later, my lawyer notified me that my application had been approved and that I needed to come back to Panama to do the signatures and picture for the permanent pensionado, He recommended that I try to get here in 2 - 3 weeks before my file was moved to the back room, where it could take days to find. I flew in for a day and a half, did the visa paperwork and flew back to the states with my pensionado. I did not move here until 7 months later.
I hope this helps. If you need a lawyer, pm me

Post a Reply

0abuse

profman2
6/27/2018 20:26 EST

We never needed any health certificate of any kind. Not sure why that requirement.

Post a Reply

0abuse

panamajames
6/27/2018 20:30 EST

It is a requirement to have a health exam. They do not want people in the country with HIV or other communicable diseases. Some lawyers will just check the box OK, and forget about it..............

Post a Reply

0abuse

allianz international health insurance

For expats in Panama, choosing an expat health insurance provider is an important decision. Get a quote from our partner, Allianz Care. Their plans ensure that you have access to quality healthcare whenever you need it. Allianz Care's flexible solutions allow you to tailor your cover to meet your needs and budget.

Get a Quote

K11501
6/27/2018 22:12 EST

Thank you - that helps so much!

One more question - my husband works for a US company currently that may allow him to continue remotely from home. Do you know if that would be permitted under the pensionado? (He's retired military collecting his pension as well). Thanks again!

Post a Reply

0abuse

Prospector
6/27/2018 22:16 EST

The pensioada visa is the only way to go...Friendly nations visa is not very friendly....its a lot more complicated and xpensive...

Post a Reply

0abuse

panamajames
6/28/2018 09:29 EST

You will not be asked if you are continually working and bringing in extra money. Once you have your Pensionado Visa from guaranteed income, that is all that they care about. You can come to Panama and have an online job in the US and make millions more. They just want to make sure that you have the minimum amount of dollars monthly here in in Panama to live on, so that you don't end up asking the Government for money supplements to drain their economy. Not that they would give you anything, anyway, but that is the idea. They don't want you on the dole, they want to know that you have enough money to support yourself.

Post a Reply

0abuse

cinparadise
6/30/2018 07:42 EST

Prospector,

You wrote:

"The pensioada visa is the only way to go...Friendly nations visa is not very friendly....its a lot more complicated and xpensive... "

Actually the internal process for the Friendly Nations visa is much simpler than the Pensionado visa hence is much quicker.

Post a Reply

0abuse

sweethomepanama
7/6/2018 14:11 EST

I have never heard of this requirement to stay in panama while waiting for a visa can others comment.

Post a Reply

0abuse

panamajames
7/6/2018 18:08 EST

Multi Entry Visa stamp in your passport is required so that you don't have to pay a $2000.00 fine for leaving Panama during the process.

Post a Reply

0abuse

wjc08
7/7/2018 09:33 EST

Check out these web sites, and insure you hire an attorney that does visas.

You will have to cut and paste these web links. http://www.embassyofpanama.org/consular-assistance/retire-in-panama/

http://www.panama-offshore-services.com/retired_pensioned_program.htm

I too am retired military. I applied in 2009. I applied then departed Panama to go back to work. I had to return several times for various reasons thru out the process. Word of caution! Check out the attorney you choose, make sure they have actually done this before! Ask to speak with others who have used them. Otherwise you could be in for a long and expensive ride. Be careful bribes are a way of life down here! Almost everyone expects them and will slow and/or delay your progress if you refuse. Good luck, see you in Panama.

Post a Reply

0abuse

wjc08
7/7/2018 09:33 EST

Check out these web sites, and insure you hire an attorney that does visas.

You will have to cut and paste these web links. http://www.embassyofpanama.org/consular-assistance/retire-in-panama/

http://www.panama-offshore-services.com/retired_pensioned_program.htm

I too am retired military. I applied in 2009. I applied then departed Panama to go back to work. I had to return several times for various reasons thru out the process. Word of caution! Check out the attorney you choose, make sure they have actually done this before! Ask to speak with others who have used them. Otherwise you could be in for a long and expensive ride. Be careful bribes are a way of life down here! Almost everyone expects them and will slow and/or delay your progress if you refuse. Good luck, see you in Panama.

Post a Reply

0abuse

gestor
7/7/2018 15:39 EST

Upon arrival, if your documentation is in order and has been sent by email to your attorney for translation by an official translator, you can give the documentation to your attorney to take to the translator, who will release your original documentation with the certified translation. You, together with your attorney, can then (the same day or the next) present your application (you have to be present to take your photo for the first visa card).

It will take 2 business days to obtain y0ur Multiple Entry visa and you are then free to travel home while your visa is processed. Please note: You have to register with Immigration PRIOR to presenting your documentation (a 10 minute process, once your priority number - as a Jubilado - has been called). The rub is that the time to call your number can vary between 10 minutes (almost never) and 6 hours (can happen). So this step must be done at least a day before presentation. You MUST use an Attorney for this process and if he/she specializes in visas, will be able to guide y0u on the documentation that is needed PRIOR to arrival. In a "best case situation" you can do the whole process within 4 business days, less if you are already registered. We have done this many times.

Post a Reply

0abuse

profman2
7/12/2018 10:49 EST

Just make sure you pay the little extra for the Multi-Entry Visa. Otherwise if you leave Panama before you receive your permanent visa you will face a $2000 per person charge.

Post a Reply

0abuse

maximoto
7/19/2018 12:55 EST

After disclosure of your pension income, does one have to file a tax return in Panama and pay taxes?

Post a Reply

0abuse

cinparadise
7/19/2018 13:11 EST

Maximoto,

Permanent residents of Panama do not pay Panamanian income taxes on income earned outside of Panama.

Post a Reply

0abuse

maximoto
7/19/2018 15:50 EST

That's nice to know.

Post a Reply

0abuse

panamajames
7/19/2018 20:08 EST

There is no double taxation in Panama. Once you have paid taxes in the US, you don't have to pay them in Panama. You can earn $11,000 yearly within Panama without paying taxes here and that includes all interest from Panama investments etc. Anything above $11,000 is taxed in Panama at 12.5% and that is only for income earned in Panama. Outside of Panama, income is tax free in Panama, but your country of origin such as the USA considers all worldwide income taxable.

Post a Reply

0abuse

PanamaJackie
7/24/2018 00:52 EST

K11501,

Yes, your husband could continue working for a US company if he has a Pensionado Visa. No work permit is needed for online work.

Only if you plan to work IN Panama selling any kind of service or product, would he need a work permit. Pensionado Visa holders can never get a work permit and are not allowed to work in Panama.

Post a Reply

0abuse

PanamaJackie
7/30/2018 19:36 EST

sweethomepanama

Getting a permanent Visa is a multiple step process.

Initially, you will be issued a processing or temporary Visa which is only good for 6 months. During that 6 months, immigration will verify all your documents.

If you do not plan to be in Panama during that 6-months, you will need to get a multi-entry stamp in your passport which allows you to leave Panama during the processing phase. If you do not get the stamp then leave Panama, there is a $2,000 file per person to get back in.

Here's an article which explains the multiple steps involved in getting a permanent residency Visa, including the multi-entry stamp

https://panamarelocationtours.com/demystifying-the-panama-residency-visa-process

Post a Reply

0abuse

Expatriate Health Insurance

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Panama.

International Moving Companies

Moving to Panama? Get a moving quote.


Mail Forwarding to Panama

Mail Forwarding to Panama.


Expat Tax

Expat Tax Preparation, Expat Tax Professionals

Join Today (free)

Join Expat Exchange to meet expats in your area or get advice before your move. It's FREE and takes 1 minute!

Cigna Expat Health InsuranceExpatriate Health Insurance

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Panama from our partner, Cigna Global Health.
Get a Quote

16-Expats-Talk-About-Moving-to-Panama16 Expats Talk About Moving to Panama

Expats living in Panama talk about making the big move to Panama, what they wish they had brought (and left behind), visas, culture shock, cost of living and more. It's a must read for anyone thinking about moving to Panama.
Expats living in Panama talk about making the big move to Panama, what they wish they had brought (and left behind), visas, culture shock, cost of living and more. It's a must read for anyone thinking...

Expat-Panama10 Tips for Living in Panama

Did you know it's hot in Panama City all year round? Did you know that it's hard to get a work visa in Panama? Did you know that Panama has great incentives for foreign retirees?

Did you know it's hot in Panama City all year round? Did you know that it's hard to get a work visa in Panama? Did you know that Panama has great incentives for foreign retirees? ...

Retiring-Abroad5 Great Places to Retire in Central America

Central America is an increasingly popular retirement destination. Retirees love it's proximity to the United States, lower cost of living, beautiful cities, amazing beaches, healthy lifestyle and friendly people.

Central America is an increasingly popular retirement destination. Retirees love it's proximity to the United States, lower cost of living, beautiful cities, amazing beaches, healthy lifestyle and fr...

Expat-Panama7 Best Places to Live in Panama

Panama is a great place to live or retire with easy residency laws, warm people and lots of expats. Whether you want to live by the beach in Bocas del Toro or need to live in Panama City for work and schools, there are many places to explore. We highlight 5 great places to live in Panama.

Panama is a great place to live or retire with easy residency laws, warm people and lots of expats. Whether you want to live by the beach in Bocas del Toro or need to live in Panama City for work and...

Retirement-In-Bocas-del-ToroAn Expat Shares What it's Like Retiring in Bocas del Toro, Panama

A expat in Panama talks about what it's like being retired in Bocas del Toro - adapting to island time, building a home on Isla Solarte, the friendly people in Bocas, the lower cost of living, the new hospital and challenges traveling in and out of Bocas.

A expat in Panama talks about what it's like being retired in Bocas del Toro - adapting to island time, building a home on Isla Solarte, the friendly people in Bocas, the lower cost of living, the new...

Moving-To-Nueva-Gorgona-An Expat Talks about Moving to Nueva Gorgona , Panama

An expat talks about moving to Nueva Gorgona and advises newcomers to rent before buying so that you can move if you don't end up liking the neighborhood. We couldn't agree more with this advice!

An expat talks about moving to Nueva Gorgona and advises newcomers to rent before buying so that you can move if you don't end up liking the neighborhood. We couldn't agree more with this advice! ...

Panama Guide
Other Links
Our Story Our Team Contact Us Submit an Article Advertising Travel Warnings

Copyright 1997-2020 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal