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Moving to Portofino, Italy | Expat Exchange
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Moving to Portofino, Italy

By Betsy Burlingame

Last updated on Jul 11, 2023

Summary: Moving to Portofino, Italy? Expats talk about what you need to know before moving to Portofino.

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What do I need to know before moving to Portofino?

When we asked people what advice they would give someone preparing to move to Portofino, they said:

"Portofino, is a small fishing village turned luxury resort town, known for its picturesque harbor and historical association with celebrity visitors. It's located on the Italian Riviera, in the region of Liguria, in the northwest of Italy. The official language is Italian, so learning some basic Italian phrases would be beneficial, although English is also widely spoken due to the high number of tourists. The cost of living in Portofino is quite high, as it's a popular tourist destination and a hotspot for the rich and famous. Housing can be expensive, and the cost of goods and services is also elevated. However, healthcare in Italy is generally of a high standard and is accessible to all residents. The local cuisine is a highlight, with a focus on fresh seafood, homemade pasta, and regional specialties like pesto Genovese. The local wine is also excellent, and dining out is a major part of the social culture. The climate in Portofino is Mediterranean, with hot, dry summers and mild, wet winters. It's a popular destination for boating and yachting, and there are many opportunities for outdoor activities like hiking and diving. Public transportation is limited in Portofino, so having a car can be beneficial. However, the town itself is very small and most places can be reached on foot. There are also regular ferry services to other towns along the Italian Riviera. The pace of life in Portofino is generally relaxed, but it can get busy during the peak tourist season in the summer. The locals are friendly and welcoming, but it's important to respect the local customs and traditions. Italy has a high standard of education, and there are international schools in the larger cities, but not in Portofino itself. If you're moving with children, you may need to consider this. Finally, it's important to note that Italy has a bureaucratic system, and dealing with paperwork can be time-consuming. It's recommended to hire a local expert or lawyer to help with the process of buying property or setting up utilities," explained one expat living in Portofino, Italy.

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About the Author

Betsy Burlingame Betsy Burlingame is the Founder and President of Expat Exchange and is one of the Founders of Digital Nomad Exchange. She launched Expat Exchange in 1997 as her Master's thesis project at NYU. Prior to Expat Exchange, Betsy worked at AT&T in International and Mass Market Marketing. She graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University with a BA in International Business and German.

Some of Betsy's articles include 12 Best Places to Live in Portugal, 7 Best Places to Live in Panama and 12 Things to Know Before Moving to the Dominican Republic. Betsy loves to travel and spend time with her family. Connect with Betsy on LinkedIn.

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