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Possible Visa changes with new President

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JaimeC
6/27/2018 11:59 EST

I am recently approved for a Residente Temporal. At 1yr renewal, could the rules change?

The reason I mention this that I had an FM3 years before and the rules dramatically changed.

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YellowTail
6/27/2018 13:08 EST

Who knows ? I believe if there were to be changes they would not happen until December when the new regime takes over.

Six years ago - when we came to Mexico with our consulate's pre-approval for RP status - nothing was a sure thing. We could still screw things up at INM.

There are an array of reasons even a naturalized Mexican citizen can lose that status,

Just for giggles I searched the web for ways a US 'green card holder' can lose it. There are many ways but the one the stood out for me was - failure to inform immigration of a change of address within TEN days of the move.

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Dharmagranny
6/27/2018 14:18 EST

Following closely. I have a permenente since October.

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Dharmagranny
6/27/2018 14:21 EST

The lose your visa rule in Mexico is failure to inform of an address change within 90 days. It is increasingly difficult to prove your address for people who rent and thus usually don't have utility bills in their own names. In Jalisco state, you absolutely can't buy a car unless you have the bills in your name and they are less than 60 days old. It will likely get more complicated and restrictive under the new regime, not less so, and that is only my opinion and is based upon experience in other developing countries which underwent changes of government to more socialistic ideals.

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YellowTail
6/27/2018 14:37 EST

We have owned our house for 5 years now - but when we rented before that we had our Telmex acct in our name and kept the CFE acct in the owner's name.

I am grateful that we are mid-way through the naturalization process here in Mexico. Every aspect of our lives is here in Mexico. In fact if Mexico were to toss us out at some point, I'm not sure we would return to the US. For us, the US is a place to eat and shop.

(I realize what INM's rules are - I was just trying to point out how, even in the US, you can be bitten).

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longtimelurker
6/27/2018 16:03 EST

Dharma, a RP will lose his RP status if they fail to report a change of address within 90 days?

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Dharmagranny
7/20/2018 06:12 EST

Yep. You have to go the the INS in your new location and report your move within 90 days.

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Retiree2
7/20/2018 07:45 EST

longtimelurker
6/27/2018 4:03 PM

"Dharma, a RP will lose his RP status if they fail to report a change of address within 90 days? "


No one loses their RT or RP vsa/card for not notifying INM of a change of address.

"MIGRATION LAW
New Law published in the Official Gazette of the Federation on May 25, 2011
CURRENT TEXT
Last reform published 12-07-2018

CHAPTER II
OF THE STAY OF FOREIGNERS IN THE NATIONAL TERRITORY

Article 64. The Institute must cancel the condition of temporary or permanent resident, for the
following causes:
I. Demonstration of the foreigner that his departure is final;
II. Authorization to the foreigner of another stay condition;
III. Providing false information or showing official or legitimate documentation to the Institute
but that has been obtained in a fraudulent manner;
IV. Losing the alien status of stay for the other causes established in this Law;
V. Losing abroad the recognition of their refugee status or complementary protection,
in accordance with the legal provisions that are applicable, and.
VI. Be subject to criminal prosecution or have been convicted of a felony under the laws
in criminal matters or the provisions contained in international treaties and conventions
of which the Mexican State is a party or because of its background in the country or abroad
could compromise national security or public safety."

http://www.diputados.gob.mx/LeyesBiblio/pdf/LMigra_120718.pdf

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Dharmagranny
7/20/2018 08:05 EST

OK OK, you could be fined. Multiple offenses would possibly red flag you, is my guess.

https://movetomexicoguide.com/mexico-immigration-programs-process-benefits/

Change of Status
You must report any changes to your status to immigration within 90 days. Status changes include your address, your employer, marriage, divorce, if you’re earning income, if your SAT taxation account has changed to inactive.

If you don’t advise INM of a change of status, you could be fined.

"Status changes can be done online. You’d then appear at an INM office along with your passport, ID, a letter and documentation related to the change. Your passport and visa will be returned immediately. In 3 plus weeks you will receive an email from INM indicating the change is completed. INM no longer retains your visa allowing you to travel while your change is processed."

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longtimelurker
7/20/2018 10:03 EST

I have a friend that is a RP and returned to the States a couple years ago. She never reported this to INM and now wants to visit Lakeside. She still has the original FMM she filled out when leaving Mexico years ago.
Do you think she will have trouble using her RP card, FMM even though it has been 2 years and she lives in the USA?

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Retiree2
7/21/2018 09:17 EST

"longtimelurker

7/20/2018 10:03 AM

I have a friend that is a RP and returned to the States a couple years ago. She never reported this to INM and now wants to visit Lakeside. She still has the original FMM she filled out when leaving Mexico years ago.
Do you think she will have trouble using her RP card, FMM even though it has been 2 years and she lives in the USA?"
She can live in her home country. She only has to noyify INM of a change of address in Mexico within 90 days. Her RP visa/card is still valid. When she enters Mexico she will need to show the Mexican INM official her US passport and her RP card. They will supply a new FMM card for her to fill out on the plane. She will hand that in also. If she rents a place she has 90 days to notify the local INM of the change of address to her new place from the one that was her previous place 2 years ago. If she doesn't stay 90 days then she doesn't need to notify her local INM office. She would only loose her RP visa/card if she immigrated to another country and became a legal resident of that country not by simply returning to live in the country of her citizenship. This is not against the INM law.

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longtimelurker
7/21/2018 20:19 EST

Retiree, that is great news. Thanks for the information.

She does have the original, top half of the FMM used when she left Mexico 2 years ago. It is still clipped in her passport.

Gracias

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Retiree2
7/21/2018 21:18 EST

"longtimelurker

7/21/2018 20:19 EST

Retiree, that is great news. Thanks for the information.

She does have the original, top half of the FMM used when she left Mexico 2 years ago. It is still clipped in her passport.

Gracias"

She doesn´t need to use the 2 year old FMM card and if she hands it to the Mexican INM oficial when entering Mexico it might be a problem explaing why she was away so long. They don´t ask many questions when entering Mexico especially for a legal resident. Many people simply fill out a new FMM card with no problem from the INM officials recieving it.

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RVGRINGO
7/22/2018 11:47 EST

Definitely trash that old FMM. If flying, simply fill out a new one, being sure to indicate your Residente Permanente status, with the visa number from the back of the card, above the signatures.
For those crossing by land, you need not bother with an FMM. Simply show your visa card at the checkpoint, as you will, of course, be walking, riding a bus, or driving a Mexican plated vehicle.

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BlackForestgal
7/26/2018 16:32 EST

We won't be able to take a U.S. state plated vehicle into Mexico? Not even to move down there and then purchase a Mexican plated vehicle? Or for any other travel into Mexico?

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BlackForestgal
7/26/2018 16:41 EST

We won't be able to take a U.S. state plated vehicle into Mexico? Not even to move down there and then purchase a Mexican plated vehicle? Or for any other travel into Mexico?

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bigfootbill
7/26/2018 16:49 EST

Black Forestgal,

Where did you read this about license plates ? There are 100 or thousands that work/drive into Mexico daily.

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YellowTail
7/26/2018 17:02 EST

With our RP pre-approvals we drove our US plated vehicle into Mexico with a 30 day TIP.

Later we nationalized the vehicle.

Times change.

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BlackForestgal
7/26/2018 17:28 EST

BigFootBill,

I was replying to this original message:

Original Message
"RVGRINGO



From: Mexico
7/22/2018 11:47 AM



Definitely trash that old FMM. If flying, simply fill out a new one, being sure to indicate your Residente Permanente status, with the visa number from the back of the card, above the signatures.
For those crossing by land, you need not bother with an FMM. Simply show your visa card at the checkpoint, as you will, of course, be walking, riding a bus, or driving a Mexican plated vehicle."

I at first was alarmed by the reference to having to drive a Mexican plated vehicle. But I as I re-read it, I realized he was talking about someone who already had a RP, not someone coming in with a RT or just a passport. My apologies for the confusion.

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bigfootbill
7/26/2018 18:34 EST

Hi
Black Forestgal,
So are you saying that if you have a Resident card you need MX plates??

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RVGRINGO
7/27/2018 12:49 EST

Expats with a Residente Temporal visa may have, and drive, a foreign plated car.
Expats with a Residente Permanente visa may not have, nor operate, a foreign plated car, unless it is owned and imported temporarily by an immediate family member. Proof of relationship should be carried.

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BlackForestgal
7/27/2018 15:57 EST

Bigfootbill,
No, I at first thought that the post I was reading was saying that, and responded, rather alarmed, right away. But he was discussing a Residente Permanente, not a Residente Temporal. But if you are entering as a Residente Temporal, or as a tourist, you can still enter with your U.S. or Canadian plated vehicle. You have to pay a deposit, and a fee, but I understand that you get your deposit back when the vehicle leaves the country. It is my understanding that as a Residente Temporal, your U.S. plated vehicle will be legal as long as your residence statis is legal. However, when you become a Residente Permanente, you MUST have a Mexican plated vehicle.

We are still living in the U.S., so all my understanding is from reading, not first hand experience. But I do think I am correct in this information. We are working on eliminating stuff to move down there too. Good luck in your move!

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