GeoBlue International Health Insurance

Ecuador Expat Forum

receiving mail and parcels

Post New Topic Newest First
biskisclan3
3/27/2021 21:16 EST

Hello all, My husband and I are moving down finally in April 21st, 2021. We will be expecting some very important documents that in the process of being apostilled. What is the quickest and safest way to receive documents. I will also be having a family member mailing some boxes of books that I will use to tutor english. If anyone has any information or advice, please let me know asap.

Post a Reply

0abuse

Penguin007
3/28/2021 12:03 EST

Good morning. Not sure if anyone answered but I have received documents from DHL and FedEX here in Salinas.

Safe travels!

Kimberly

Post a Reply

0abuse

GeoBlue International Health Insurance

For more than 20 years, GeoBlue has helped the globally mobile navigate the complexities of international health insurance, providing members with confidence and peace of mind. Wherever your destination, GeoBlue can keep you and your family covered with the right health insurance. Click here to speak with GeoBlue's Sales Team.

Penguin007
3/28/2021 12:03 EST

Good morning. Not sure if anyone answered but I have received documents from DHL and FedEX here in Salinas.

Safe travels!

Kimberly

Post a Reply

0abuse

Restingnow
3/29/2021 18:27 EST

Greetings Biskisclan3,

I've used DHL to receive documents. It went well. It would likely be very expensive for sending boxes of books, though.
My understanding is that Ecuador is currently reestablishing a postal service, which was closed down about 6 (?) months ago. It may not be realistic to rely on it's existence in the near future. Frankly, it was hit and miss, (probably with the emphasis on miss) when it was up and running. It could take months for mail to arrive from the States... and sometimes it wouldn't arrive at all. I think Quito and Cuenca had the best service, sometimes receiving letters within 3-4 weeks. A box of books would also have to go through customs.
Maybe someone reading can offer a success story... but as things stand now, shipping books will most likely present some difficulty, or a big expense (DHL or FedEx). Good luck.

Post a Reply

0abuse

Womblingfree
3/29/2021 21:32 EST

What about using US Global Mail? They offer discounted shipping rates from the U.S. to expats abroad. I'm considering opening an account prior to moving to Ecuador. It also allows you to check your mail online from anywhere you can access the Web and you can tell them what to throw away, what to scan for you, what to open, and what to ship. The company has been around a long time and seems solid - based in Houston, Texas. Suffices as a U.S. based street address for most purposes.

Post a Reply

0abuse

Kimac
3/30/2021 09:39 EST

However inconvenient it is to bring those books with you as another piece of luggage, you'll be glad you did.

A good cardboard book box, reinforced with strapping tape for the weight of the books and maybe some other stuff, will represent another piece of luggage and cost ~$50, BUT you will be avoiding sorts of problems.

Forget regular mail in any form, and go with DHL whenever possible when you need to receive documents. Have stuff sent to the street address shown for one of their local offices, with instructions to call you for pick-up there. This the common way people use them to avoid final delivery problems. When you go by their office you will see them go through a tray with dozens of other courier packs awaiting pick-up from folks doing this.

Documents can generally be handled just fine this way. But other packages with pretty much anything, including books, are subject to the Gods de la Aduana. Your books will cost far more than the above $50 for a box to be sent, plus they may be lost, they will certainly be delayed, and very likely be assessed some of tariff or other fee.

As much as humanly possible, bring stuff down as additional pieces of luggage.

Post a Reply

0abuse

GeoBlue International Health Insurance

For more than 20 years, GeoBlue has helped the globally mobile navigate the complexities of international health insurance, providing members with confidence and peace of mind. Wherever your destination, GeoBlue can keep you and your family covered with the right health insurance. Click here to speak with GeoBlue's Sales Team.

Kimac
3/30/2021 09:51 EST

PS:

US Global Mail in Houston is wonderful as a mail drop to maintain a legal residence in the US, as well as to manage the full range of shipping issues, and I've had a box there for many years.

There are similar services elsewhere, often located in Florida, pitching themselves more specifically to Latin American expats. Both Florida and Texas have no state income tax, so that works out well when you have to have a declared state residence. Aside from originally being from Texas and wanting to maintain a residence there, I went with USGM because they offer an authentic-sounding residential addresses.

Unlike UPS stores, they specialize in handling these international delivery issues and provide other specialized services as well. UPS stores will insist on using UPS for international deliveries, which is not always optimal, plus they will insist you use their silly addressing convention, that makes it clear they are a just a mail drop. I have run into problems using UPS stores, because many financial institutions have software that recognizes them as a mail drop and disallows your using them as a "residence." (Whenever you do get cornered into declaring a foreign residence you will find problems. They are solvable, but I recently had to do this and it is something to avoid if at all possible.

Post a Reply

0abuse

SageMind
3/30/2021 10:53 EST

Could you speak to whst you mean by being cornered into de lasting foreign residence ? What causes this to occur?

Post a Reply

0abuse

kmoriarty45
3/30/2021 11:13 EST

Faced with the ginormous costs of bringing my library here when I moved, I had a book sale and then donated what wasn't sold to the VA hospital near me in Florida through the VFW.

With the money I earned from the sale of my books I bought a Tablet to download and read whatever I chose. There are, aside from Amazon, a lot of FREE electronic libraries - like the Guttenburg Project - you can access and download whatever books you like for free.

Although I miss the feel of a book in my hand, I don't miss the exorbitant costs of importing them nor space they take up. I've built up quite an electronic book collection in the years I've lived here and enjoyed the convenience of being able to read whatever I want, whenever I want, whereever I am.

Post a Reply

0abuse

Womblingfree
3/30/2021 11:48 EST

"being cornered into declaring foreign residence" can happen when a U.S. investment firm, governmental agency or bank rejects the mail box address you want to give them and demands a physical street address to prove your permanent residency within the country.

Post a Reply

0abuse

user001
3/31/2021 21:22 EST

Only way you will receive a package in ecuador is currently

1) DHL (or similar)
2) Miami based mule services


Both are expensive.

Post a Reply

0abuse

gyuris
4/1/2021 14:11 EST

Books are duty free, .... (as long as you don't mix in something dutiable with them in the same box.)

Post a Reply

0abuse

Join Today (free)

Join Expat Exchange to meet expats in your area or get advice before your move. It's FREE and takes 1 minute!

GeoBlue International Health InsuranceExpatriate Health Insurance

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Ecuador from our partner, GeoBlue.
Get a Quote

Get a quote for expat health insurance in Ecuador from our partner, GeoBlue.
Get a Quote Call  

Ecuador Forum Ecuador Forum
Join our Ecuador forum to meet other expats and talk about living in Ecuador.

Living in Ecuador GuideLiving in Ecuador Guide

Expats in Ecuador share some of the pros and cons of living in Ecuador. Topics covered include where to live, the bureaucracy, the people and more.

Moving to EcuadorMoving to Ecuador Guide

Expats in Ecuador offer advice to newcomers and people considering a move to Ecuador about clothing, sunscreen, renting before buying, gringo pricing, Ecuadorians politeness and much more.

Best Places to Live in Ecuador Best Places to Live in Ecuador

Expats share some of their favorite places to live in Ecuador from beautiful colonial cities to affordable beach towns.

Healthcare in EcuadorHealthcare in Ecuador

Expats in Ecuador share their experiences with healthcare and overseas medical insurance in Ecuador.

Real Estate EcuadorReal Estate in Ecuador

Real estate listings in popular cities and towns in Ecuador.

Pros Cons of Living in EcuadorPros & Cons of Living in Ecuador

Take off your rose-colored glasses and learn what expats have to say about the biggest challenges and the greatest rewards of living in Ecuador.

10 Tips for Living in Ecuador10 Tips for Living in Ecuador

Expats in Ecuador appreciate the cost of living, the friendly people, the beautiful weather and warm culture. The bureaucracy can be very trying, petty theft an issue and driving downright dangerous.

8-Tips-for-Living-in-Cuenca,-Ecuador8 Tips for Living in Cuenca, Ecuador

Many expats in Cuenca, Ecuador love the city's climate, friendly people and low cost of living. Other expats find that this developing city's bland food, dirty streets and noisy neighborhoods are too much to take.

Ecuador-Check-In-and-Help-Needed-ThreadEcuador Check-In and Help Needed Thread

The earthquake in Ecuador has impacted many areas where our members reside. Our thoughts and prayers are with everyone in Ecuador. We have setup a Check-In and Help Needed thread for our members in Ecuador.

Top-10-Reasons-to-Consider-Ecuador-for-Your-RetirementTop 10 Reasons to Consider Ecuador for Your Retirement

Retirees in Ecuador enjoy an incredible number of benefits in their expat life abroad. Here are ten of the best reasons to consider this South American country when you look abroad for retirement.

Thanksgiving-in-EcuadorThanksgiving in Ecuador

For American expats looking to dine out on Thanksgiving, here's a list of several restaurants offering Thanksgiving dinners in Quito and Cuena.

Copyright 1997-2021 Burlingame Interactive, Inc.

Privacy Policy Legal