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Trucking jobs?

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TruckerLee
6/8/2019 11:45 EST

Hi I’m looking at trying to find out where I can get some information on how I can go about being able to move from the US to Ireland and then transfer my driver license for a commercial driver license and then be able to get a job offer to get a work permit and a job to then be able to get a job and be able to move and live in Ireland. My dad just got his Irish citizenship through ancestry by descent from his grandparents and I’d like to be able to move and follow him there to Ireland as I’ve been there before and loved it there and have visited my relatives there before but I need to find the best way to move there. If someone who has already made the move could help me that would be a great help, would it be better for me to move over there, get an apartment and get my license switched over, get a bank account etc all set up and actually be there in person for a few months while I look for a job to make it easier and then once I get the job , then apply for the work visa or is it easier and better to try for it while I’m still here. I read online that a lot of recruitment agencies won’t reply to you unless you’re actually in Ireland so that’s why I was thinking about moving there and getting it all setup and be settled in while I get my license taken care of and look for a job so that I’d have a better chance of actually finding and getting a job. Any ideas or input from those of you who have already been through this and made the move? Thanks in advance for all of your help and input

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dbarnwell
6/8/2019 12:53 EST

Trucker
If your father is a citizen then you are also eligible.

Are you American?

As regards driving, the Irish introduced some ridiculous laws which mean that experienced American drivers have to sign up for Drivers Ed courses. Even though. they know to drive and have driven a half- million miles. (I knew such a case).

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Meachair54
6/8/2019 13:28 EST

Hello TruckerLee
Go to NDLS.ie ,For clarification on exchanging driver licenses. U.S. drivers licenses don’t fall under the exchange agreement also driving professionals might not fall under critical skills requirement. You also must check Citizens.ie for moving to Ireland rules. Sorry to say you might have a few roadblocks , good luck!!!

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Meachair54
6/8/2019 13:39 EST

That last website is Citizens Information. Ie for info on moving to Ireland

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Meachair54
6/8/2019 14:36 EST

Trucker you said your father just got citizenship thru his grandparents..... so you won’t be able to get Irish citizenship thru descent your father would have to have gotten Irish citizenship before you were born, for you to be entitled to Irish citizenship. Good luck on your endeavors!

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TruckerLee
6/8/2019 15:43 EST

Yes I know that he would have to have got his citizenship before I was born in order for me to be eligible to get it also, which I why I am looking into the options of getting a driving job over there and I did read that I would have to take a driving course, but apparently I don’t have to take the full class, just a partial one because of experience you can then qualify for only taking certain parts of the class. I was just curious about what is the best route to take as far as being able to move and get everything set up over there from someone with a bit of experience or a bit more knowledge about it than me who has maybe already done it. Should I or would it be easier, or is it easier/ would it be better for me to move there and take the class to get my license, get an apartment so I have a local address and phone number, local bank account etc all set up and established and then look for getting a job offer to then try for a work visa to then be able to be able to move and live there? Am just curious about what is the best route to take.

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DebAckley
6/8/2019 17:26 EST

That’s what I thought too. Jobs will go to Irish & EU folks first.

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DebAckley
6/8/2019 17:35 EST

Just read citizens information....in order for the Trucker to get Irish citizenship, his father would need citizenship before he was born...if that’s the case...he’s good ?

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TruckerLee
6/8/2019 20:21 EST

Yes I do realize that jobs would likely go to Irish or UK citizens first and then after that, then to the most qualified person, and as I have read and heard Ireland is in the same situation as the USA is in and has a shortage of truck drivers, so if they’re needing qualified drivers then I would surely qualify.

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Meachair54
6/8/2019 21:10 EST

Hello Deb
Trucker’s father just got his dual citizenship thru his grandparents ... he’s not eligible for citizenship thru ancestors nor will be able to exchange his drivers license

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Meachair54
6/8/2019 21:42 EST

Trucker,
Did you go to citizens information .ie ? You need to see requirements to move and stay in Ireland as a U.S. citizen you can stay for ninety days plus you have to be a resident of Ireland to qualify for a license , you need to show proof of residents...... you should read about what is involved with driving classes they are time consuming and expensive if you could qualify to stay in the country. Read the info carefully before making a big decision or mistake..... once again wish you luck!!!

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Joshuak
6/8/2019 21:56 EST

You can go to Ireland, get a apartment and even open a bank account, as long as you can do all that in 90 days. However, I do not believe you qualify for a drivers course because last I knew Ireland requires a PPS number for drivers license applications now. Just being in Ireland as a tourist does not qualify you for PPS number. Instead if you apply for immigration, you will be required to have a Qualified income from outside Ireland of about $57000 US per year and about $175000 US to deposit in an Irish Bank ? You would also need expensive health insurance. You would only qualify for the infamous "Stamp 0" visa which does not allow you to work in Ireland. You need to realize you are dreaming about moving to another sovereign country and it is not the same as moving from Maine to Texas. Ireland has it's own rules for immigration. You do not qualify for citizenship via ancestry as others have already told you, so you are the same as any non-EU person for immigration.

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TruckerLee
6/8/2019 23:06 EST

I know that I don’t qualify for citizenship or anything like that, but I have read a lot about immigration and there is a bit that seems to be a bit confusing to some degree on some issues. I know that there are ways to move there legally and be able to get a visa and get a job and all of that to be able to move there and work and stay there, same as others here on this site have done, which is why I am here on this site asking for help so that I can be able to do the same thing and then I get replies that try to make it sound like I have a impossible dream and that it isn’t possible which certainly is not the case. All I am asking for here is a bit of help and some information on how I can go about this in the best way possible hopefully from someone who has been in this same situation and would be nice enough and be willing to help me and if the others are not able or not willing to help them they aren’t the ones who I am looking to communicate with

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Mellis5910
6/9/2019 04:01 EST

I'm usually very positive in outlook and don't want to discourage you, BUT perhaps this link will help clarify things for you: https://dbei.gov.ie/en/What-We-Do/Workplace-and-Skills/Employment-Permits/Employment-Permit-Eligibility/Ineligible-Categories-of-Employment/ Trucking jobs appear to be on the ineligible list for the most part, with the exception of certain professional level licenses. The key is establishing a right to reside, which you hoped to get through your job. But a job will require a PPS number...which will be almost impossible to get. Does your father need a carer? Not sure if that role could be filled by you but might be something to look into. Good luck, hope you find a way forward.

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Muddled
6/9/2019 06:11 EST

I agree the OPs that replied - unfortunately you have a tall order that many have tried to fill before and failed. Moving to another country isn't easy nor without its challenges. Also visiting a foreign country is nothing like living here! If you could get the ninety days off work in the U.S. (while maintaining your residence there) and have the specialist driving skills that may be considered in Ireland for a work permit you could, perhaps, come over and get a better feel for whether you could realistically get work. Try finding an Irish company that hires drives with those specialties - that is just one hurdle. Are you familiar with the roads and other important transport laws and regulations here?

I have dual-citizenship and I wasn't able to get a job in Ireland until I moved here nearly 25 years ago. Had I been qualified in I|T or some other sought-after profession things might have been different. Now things are much more difficult with many people wanting to live and work in Ireland and the rest of Europe.

Category 821 covers road transport workers, and as another poster mentioned there are a few exceptions
https://dbei.gov.ie/en/What-We-Do/Workplace-and-Skills/Employment-Permits/Employment-Permit-Eligibility/Ineligible-Categories-of-Employment/

https://dbei.gov.ie/en/What-We-Do/Workplace-and-Skills/Employment-Permits/Permit-Types/General-Employment-Permit/

Has your father lived in Ireland long? Do you think he will stay indefinitely? I have seen many people move to Ireland only to leave again for many reasons.

Not sure you would be eligible for Carers Allowance in Ireland (if your father needs a carer?) as you'd need a PPSN, need to satisfy the Habitual Residence conditions and more than likely the Department of Social Welfare would look at your contributions to the Irish tax system, i.e. have already worked here for many years.

Here's a link to transport jobs in Ireland - I don't have a clue about the CE and C1E licence allowable for a work permit, but driving here is not for the faint-hearted!

I don't like to discourage, but these are the realities relating to your query.
Also, I can honestly say having an American "name" and accent has very much worked against me when looking for work and otherwise settling in; but I've been here a while and the locals are used to me.

I wish you well.

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Muddled
6/9/2019 08:47 EST

After my spiel, I left off the link to drivers jobs (that's why I Muddled):
https://www.jobs.ie/Jobs.aspx?hd_searchbutton=true&Keywords=ce+licence&Regions=0&Categories=181&job-search=true

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TruckerLee
6/9/2019 11:07 EST

I will look at those links you posted and see, and I do have a good bit of experience that I think would be very helpful, especially if Ireland is experiencing a driver shortage more so than we are here in the US. I have many years of experience and a good variety of experience with different types of trucks, but as far as my father he just got his dual citizenship and he has been in touch with some of our extended family there for a while and has been visiting there several times but he hasn’t yet moved there. He is finishing up a few things here to sell his house and then move there and he is retired from the military and then yet again from the government here so he won’t need to work when he’s there. I am sure once he is there he will end up staying there. I would like to be able to move there and do the same thing if it’s possible, but it’s looking like the driver shortage isn’t as bad as I had heard , even though I did hear that Ireland has let in many people who are from Eastern Europe in to fill the driver shortage, so I was thinking and hoping that I could do the same thing and drive truck there in Ireland to help fill the shortage and I’d also be able to move there and live there with my dad too when he gets moved there shortly. I will have to continue doing a bit more research and as far as coming over there and being out of work for a bit to take a driving class in order to get my license there is something that I have already researched and know and am expecting so I have that all planned for.

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Muddled
6/9/2019 12:17 EST

Many eastern European countries are in the EU, that's one less hurdle to living and working in Ireland, if you come from another EU country.

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susannamca
6/9/2019 14:43 EST

TruckerLee, First, most if not all Eastern European countries are in the EU, so Eastern European truck drivers have no issues getting Irish licences or jobs. Second, you will not be permitted to apply for an Irish driving licence without proof that you have permission to live in Ireland. If you look at www.inis.gov.ie you will find up to date, accurate information on who can get permission and how to qualify. Good luck.

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TruckerLee
6/9/2019 15:51 EST

Yes I do know and realize that Poland and other countries are Eastern Europe and are a part of the EU and therefore have an easier time to move, work and get a job and license in Ireland and yes that is one less hurdle for them, but from what I have heard from a few other people that work the driver shortage is that there are also a good number of people who are from non EU countries who have somehow managed to get a job and a license and been able to move there and live, so somehow it’s possible, but I just haven’t been able to find out what I need to do to make it happen yet like they were able to do apparently because I don’t believe that South Africa is in Eastern Europe. Apparently they were able to find a way to do it and I just haven’t discovered what I need to do to be able to do what they did yet I guess. Anyways thanks for all of your help with this even though it is not looking good for me

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susannamca
6/9/2019 16:09 EST

South Africa is one of the countries with which Ireland has an exchange agreement about driving licences -- no lessons needed. Same for Japan, South Korea, Switzerland, New Zealand, Australia, Taiwan, etc.

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Meachair54
6/9/2019 16:11 EST

Trucker Lee
South Africa drivers license is on the list of exchangeable licenses!
Everyone has been giving you correct info on the topics you asked about but your response is the same to every persons answer........ yes I know that but other people have told you it is still possible to realize your dream. This is the same response for the last two days on the forum!!
You should stick to the people who are telling you differently or you should read the sites people on this forum have been steering you to for the correct info that you are asking about.... once again good luck!!!!

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Joshuak
6/9/2019 17:07 EST

Yes, there are a few Africans that have been allowed in for various reasons by the Government but you are talking small numbers. It appears someone in the Government decided it was a good idea to have a few diverse cultures and races. Just because you know how to drive an over the road commercial freight carrier in the US does not mean you have enough knowledge to do so in Ireland. It is a lot different, even driving a car. I had visited many, many times before I moved there and stayed for a bit over a year. I bought 2 used cars during that time, and when I visited in the past I always rented a car, so I did get some experience driving there. But I can tell you even after all that, it could still be a nail biting experience on some narrow roads which are all over Ireland. I cannot imagine driving a large truck there and I have driven large vehicles here in US. You seem to be a young man and you have not mentioned if you have your own family, ie wife or children ? If you are indeed quite young, why not go back and get university degree in some discipline that would qualify your skills to be needed in Ireland and you could get hired by a Irish tech company. These days one can get a degree taking classes on the internet with minimal time in classes. You could still drive and make a living. AS many have told you, you have a near impossible task to do what you wish to do. Some people have given you a hint as to another way which is if your father is somewhat disabled and needs a carer. In other words you would probably have to go through a course here in US to be a care giver for disabled or someone that needs medical help to live. Not sure what the requirements are in Ireland. I have a Niece here that does that for her disabled sister. However, If he does not need any help, suggest you not try to fake it. Usually will get caught.

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TruckerLee
6/9/2019 18:16 EST

No I am not really all that young, though that is a relative term depending on what you define as young, usually depending on what your current age is. As I had previously said I believe, I have over two decades of experience driving trucks and most of that is driving heavy haul trucks and lately I have been instructing commercial driving, so as far as experience I would say that yes I am qualified and I have been to Ireland before as stated previously. As far as being able to drive a truck there I doubt that it would be that much different than here, even though it might be for some of you, and that’s not an ego thing it’s an experience thing and the fact that with instructing I already sit on the “ Right “ side of the truck and end up shifting the truck a fair bit of the time so that part of it wouldn’t be an issue, the road signs are not really all that hard to figure out or much different than here and a few different rules for trucking as far as hours of service and weight limits and that type of stuff that I would have to learn but that varies here also depending on what state you’re in to some degree and what truck configuration you are driving also, so not really that big of a deal to go drive a different truck. And I know that Ireland doesn’t do a license exchange with the USA, but they do with NZ, and yet NZ does do a straight across license exchange with the USA. So go figure that one out. Go to NZ, exchange US license for a NZ license, then to Ireland and exchange brand new NZ license for a Irish license, though that still doesn’t alleviate the issue with immigration and a work visa giving me the legal right to work in Ireland. I’m just stating out some facts that with all of the time I have spent researching and reading about this, I have read and learned a lot about it, but I don’t know everything that I need to know about it, which is why I am here. So anyways I think I’m going to leave you all alone now and be off to go research and do more reading up some more information on this and see if there’s anything that I have missed.

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DebAckley
6/9/2019 20:15 EST

You also need to think
Of health insurance if u r not a citizen

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